Town in Romania – Ardud http://ardud.ro/ Wed, 09 Jun 2021 19:21:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.7.2 https://ardud.ro/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Town in Romania – Ardud http://ardud.ro/ 32 32 SynBio Coalition Applauds Senate Passage of U.S. Innovation and Competition Act https://ardud.ro/synbio-coalition-applauds-senate-passage-of-u-s-innovation-and-competition-act/ https://ardud.ro/synbio-coalition-applauds-senate-passage-of-u-s-innovation-and-competition-act/#respond Wed, 09 Jun 2021 18:49:00 +0000 https://ardud.ro/synbio-coalition-applauds-senate-passage-of-u-s-innovation-and-competition-act/ WASHINGTON, June 9, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Today, the SynBio Coalition, a non-partisan group of leaders in the synthetic biology industry, yesterday welcomed the bipartisan passage of the U.S. Innovation and Competition Act (USICA) by the Senate. The USICA, which includes key provisions of the Endless Frontier Act, will strengthen US competitiveness and innovation […]]]>


WASHINGTON, June 9, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Today, the SynBio Coalition, a non-partisan group of leaders in the synthetic biology industry, yesterday welcomed the bipartisan passage of the U.S. Innovation and Competition Act (USICA) by the Senate. The USICA, which includes key provisions of the Endless Frontier Act, will strengthen US competitiveness and innovation in biotechnology and synthetic biology. It supports research, education, workforce development and other measures to coordinate scientific development and encourage the growth of a new manufacturing industry.

USICA reaffirms the importance of synthetic biology in the face of the many challenges facing the country. Notably, synthetic biology and biosafety efforts have been critical to the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, demonstrating the enormous promise of biological solutions.

This landmark legislation encompasses solutions and supports strong scientific research and economic development efforts needed to realize the powerful potential of synthetic biology. It includes strong support for STEM education and workforce development the creation of a new division within the National Science Foundation, the Directorate of Technology and Innovation; and the formation of a national bioengineering research and development initiative. Together, these and other measures will contribute to the development of the US bioeconomy, which is essential for the future of biosecurity and US economic growth. A recent report indicated that over the next decades, a visible pipeline of biological applications could create approximately $ 2 at 4 trillion dollars direct annual economic impact on a global scale.

“Yesterday’s passage represents an important inflection point for the entire synthetic biology industry, which is poised to be the main engine of economic growth and employment over the next century. “, said Christina smolke, CEO of Anthéia. “We are delighted to see bipartisan support for synthetic biology and we are committed to working with the government to harness its incredible potential.”

“Consumer demand, technological expertise and government support are a powerful trio in stimulating the continued growth of America’s bioeconomy,” said Christophe Schilling, CEO of Genomatica. “Policies and investments in synbio innovation and the growth of bio-based manufacturing are crucial support in a wholesale transition to sustainable materials, making better products with a better environmental profile to make our world a better place. ”

“As we were leaving our graduate studies at MIT In building a horizontal platform for cell programming at Ginkgo, my co-founders and I saw the transformative power of government investment in scientific innovation and coordination, ”said Jason kelly, CEO of Ginkgo Bioworks. “Our generation has an incredible opportunity to harness biology for the sustainability, health and well-being of our communities and partners around the world. Legislation like this will help us realize that future. . ”

The SynBio Coalition remains committed to working with the federal government to develop this innovative sector and create well-paying jobs in the United States, and looks forward to working with Congress and the Biden administration on these critical issues.

ABOUT THE SYNBIO COALITION

Founded by three of the leading synthetic biology companies, the SynBio Coalition is a non-partisan group of business leaders and stakeholders dedicated to advancing synthetic biology as a driver of technological innovation and economic growth. . The SynBio Coalition aims to make the United States home to the world’s safest and most technologically advanced bioproduction industry.

SOURCE SynBio Coalition



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Arizona State University: Sharmistha Bagchi-Sen to join ASU as Director of School of Geography and Urban Planning https://ardud.ro/arizona-state-university-sharmistha-bagchi-sen-to-join-asu-as-director-of-school-of-geography-and-urban-planning/ https://ardud.ro/arizona-state-university-sharmistha-bagchi-sen-to-join-asu-as-director-of-school-of-geography-and-urban-planning/#respond Mon, 07 Jun 2021 23:18:47 +0000 https://ardud.ro/arizona-state-university-sharmistha-bagchi-sen-to-join-asu-as-director-of-school-of-geography-and-urban-planning/ Each new academic year brings new faces to the university. For the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, new faces will not only be in the classroom, but also at the head of the school as Sharmistha Bagchi-Sen has been appointed principal, a role she will assume from July 1. Prior to joining ASU, […]]]>


Each new academic year brings new faces to the university. For the School of Geographical Sciences and Urban Planning, new faces will not only be in the classroom, but also at the head of the school as Sharmistha Bagchi-Sen has been appointed principal, a role she will assume from July 1.

Prior to joining ASU, Bagchi-Sen was a professor in the Department of Geography at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Her time there also included a stint as chair of the department from 2010 to 2016 and service as co-director of the Institute for Research and Education on Women and Gender.

Sharmistha Bagchi-Sen joins ASU as Director and Professor at the School of Geographic Sciences and Urban Planning.

“Dr. Bagchi-Sen brings with her a wealth of administrative and leadership experience. A leading scholar and visible researcher, she is the ideal person to lead the School of Geographic Sciences and Urban Planning into the future, ”said Pardis Mahdavi, dean of social sciences at The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

Human-geographer, Bagchi-Sen’s research specifically touches on the themes of urban and economic geography. Her current research focuses on analyzing the relationship between demographic changes and socio-economic outcomes, a work she will continue to study at ASU.

His previous research has focused on foreign direct investment in the United States, followed by the study of drivers and barriers to innovation in various high-tech industries, including the biopharmaceutical and bioenergy sectors. Bagchi-Sen focuses on industrial studies with a deep interest in understanding how industrial change affects regions. In recent years, she has undertaken research on declining cities in deindustrialized regions of the United States to study the relationship between population and economic decline. As part of this research, she also examined debates surrounding local-regional policy and planning options.

Bagchi-Sen’s research was funded by the National Science Foundation and she has a long-standing collaboration with academics in the UK and Sweden. In 2020, she held the position of Program Director for Environmental Sciences and Geography with the National Science Foundation, a position that involved managing proposals submitted to multiple programs and participating in broader discussions at the National Science Foundation. within these programs on future directions, a position which will come to an end with the transition of Bagchi-Sen to the position of school principal.

“Dr Bagchi-Sen is joining our school at a time of incredible growth and opportunity,” said Elisabeth wentz, Dean and Vice-Rector of ASU Graduate College, who last year also served as Acting Director of the School of Geographic Sciences and Urban Planning, where she also holds a faculty position. “I look forward to seeing how it expands our research and programming possibilities. His research distinctions and administrative experience will be very useful to the unit, to our faculty and in particular to our students. “

“I am inspired by ASU’s reconceptualization of 21st century higher education and the School of Geographic and Urban Planning dedication to inclusiveness, excellence and impact. broader societal, ”Bagchi-Sen said. “I hope to work with everyone in the school to continue to achieve excellence in research, teaching and service (and) to maintain the visibility of the school at ASU and within the discipline. . ”

Families providing 24-hour care to veterans or infirm military personnel will have volunteer caregivers to help them for another three years, as a federal agency has renewed funding for a 20-year-old ASU program that administers the ‘help.

AmeriCorps agreed in May to continue funding Legacy Corps for Veteran and Military Families (LCVMF). The renewed financial support from the federal agency and other sub-awarded organizations, which begins Sept. 1, totals approximately $ 13.3 million and will continue until 2024, the LCVMF principal investigator said. David swindell, professor at ASU School of Public Affairs.

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LCVMF, or Legacy Corps for short, is a Watts College of Public Service and Community Solutions-National program based on which since 2001 has provided respite caregivers to families of over 720 veterans and military in need of 24-hour service. Volunteers provide care in eight states, including Arizona.

Legacy Corps was developed to meet the need for respite care designed specifically for families caring for veterans or military personnel. Its goal is to keep loved ones in their community longer, by postponing or completely avoiding institutional care.

Swindell, who is also director of ASU Urban innovation center, said he was grateful to ASU for continuing to be the home of Legacy Corps.

“We are fortunate to have such great nonprofit partners across the country working with us and AmeriCorps members to provide this under-provided service,” said Swindell. “Helping key caregivers who care for other veterans and military family members helps everyone involved and exemplifies ASU and Watts College’s commitment to community service. “

Legacy Corps deploys over 500 AmeriCorps volunteers to help families through 14 partner agencies. In February, Arizona became the eighth state served by Legacy Corps by adding Phoenix-based Hospice of the Valley as its final partner organization.

Many of the more than 720 families that Legacy Corps volunteers serve include Vietnam War veterans, but they also help WWII and Korean War veterans, said Jack Steele, national program director. of the Legacy Corps. Some patients suffer from the effects of Agent Orange or have problems with knowledge, he said. Ongoing funding means veterans or military personnel stay at home longer.

“This will allow us to train 512 AmeriCorps members who come to their homes to provide support services to caregivers, to allow the veteran or military member to stay at home,” said Steele.

Funding includes a monthly stipend of $ 200 that allows each volunteer to pay for personal needs such as groceries and transportation. That’s a fraction of the cost of hiring a full-time home health care worker. Volunteers are also eligible for funding for the cost of their college attendance of up to $ 1,500 per year. At age 55, the volunteer can transfer this amount to a child or grandchild.

Many Arizona volunteers are ASU students, said Steele, occupying 24 of 50 volunteer positions.

“It’s different from a home health care worker,” Steele said. “They really become like family.”


This press release was produced by Arizona State University. The opinions expressed here are those of the author.



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Building a “social Europe” is more necessary than ever after COVID-19 https://ardud.ro/building-a-social-europe-is-more-necessary-than-ever-after-covid-19/ https://ardud.ro/building-a-social-europe-is-more-necessary-than-ever-after-covid-19/#respond Mon, 07 Jun 2021 05:32:22 +0000 https://ardud.ro/building-a-social-europe-is-more-necessary-than-ever-after-covid-19/ A compass for the recovery of Europe The data shows how far the action plan is from reaching its potential to become “an effective European pillar of social rights which could serve as a compass for Europe’s recovery,” said Sadwoski. He stressed that there are still 108 million people living in poverty and social exclusion […]]]>


A compass for the recovery of Europe

The data shows how far the action plan is from reaching its potential to become “an effective European pillar of social rights which could serve as a compass for Europe’s recovery,” said Sadwoski.

He stressed that there are still 108 million people living in poverty and social exclusion in the EU, while the quality of employment is so poor in some regions that “more needs to be done for them. 17.5 million people at risk of poverty and social exclusion. despite having a job.

In this context, the final Declaration of the Porto Social Summit urges Member States to achieve quantitative targets in three areas: employment, skills and poverty.

There are several employment targets: 78% of the working-age population by 2030 have a job, halve the gender employment gap and reduce the number of young people neither in employment nor in employment. education. However, Sadowski said he would have liked to see more employment sub-goals, for example those relating to vulnerable groups affected by the pandemic, such as young people. “It’s important to avoid the so-called ‘creaming’ that is easier to reach and to make sure no one is really left behind.”

Regarding education goals, Sadowski criticized the fact that the professional skills discussed in the declaration lie only in the green and digital context, and not in a broader aspect, for example to strengthen active citizenship. “Considering skills related only to participation in the labor market can lead to further exclusion of the most vulnerable groups.

The events of the Porto Social Summit also showed how the principles of Social Europe have yet to be accepted by some EU political bodies, in particular in the eastern part of the EU. At the summit, there was a typical clash with the Polish and Hungarian nationalist-populist governments over the term “gender equality”, which had to be removed from the final declaration.

Sadowski said such attacks on gender equality and discrimination against LGBT people require a response. “Social commitment was amended, but the words were spoken and they resonated not only in the closing plenary session, but across Europe. We, as a social platform, working with our social partners, will continue to demand that Europe build a single social model ”which is inclusive and socially just.

“I speak on behalf of the Social Platform, but I also speak as an individual and as a European. I’m also a gay man and I know what it’s like to be ostracized, discriminated against and feel like an inferior person, ”he said, adding that his definition of European social model is one “where the backlash against gender equality and branding certain groups of people as ideologies is completely eradicated.”



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The little-known demographic situation in West Bengal and the consequences to come https://ardud.ro/the-little-known-demographic-situation-in-west-bengal-and-the-consequences-to-come/ https://ardud.ro/the-little-known-demographic-situation-in-west-bengal-and-the-consequences-to-come/#respond Sun, 06 Jun 2021 07:01:25 +0000 https://ardud.ro/the-little-known-demographic-situation-in-west-bengal-and-the-consequences-to-come/ As the impact of the year-round COVID19 pandemic continues to be felt in different parts of India – where patriarchy is embedded in the social code and inequalities against women are intuitively practiced – the repercussions of the health crisis as well as the deepening gender gaps are being borne disproportionately and severely by women. […]]]>


As the impact of the year-round COVID19 pandemic continues to be felt in different parts of India – where patriarchy is embedded in the social code and inequalities against women are intuitively practiced – the repercussions of the health crisis as well as the deepening gender gaps are being borne disproportionately and severely by women. Yet most of the talk around the pandemic has been either gender neutral or gender neutral, often resulting in the subjugation or systemic marginalization of women.

Faced with these challenges, the thematic debate on equality between women and men can no longer continue only on paper, it must in fact be transformed into actions by the Indian government in order to face the short-term consequences of pandemic as well as to develop long-term sustainable peace. Adopting a Feminist Foreign Policy (FFP) framework is the best way to achieve this dual objective. An FFP could offer India a concrete opportunity to put in place a more inclusive policy framework; break with the predominant patriarchal notions; and address pandemic relief strategies – from the perspective of women and other vulnerable or under-represented groups in society.

Gendered impact of COVID19 in India

In India’s socio-cultural and economic fields – which have historically been marred by inequalities and rigid stereotypes – the gender effects of the COVID19 pandemic have been both intersectional and complex.

For starters, due to the rapid increase in the number of patients with COVID-19, healthcare workers in India, especially nurses whose about 88.9 percent are women remain much more vulnerable to contracting the deadly virus. The existing problem of shortage of basic equipment for these healthcare workers further exacerbates these concerns.

Second, the pandemic has negatively impacted an already shrinking Indian economy, leading to financial cuts and rising unemployment. Women, either because of deep-rooted patriarchal attitudes or because of the unconscious biases that flow from such attitudes, have been at the forefront of temporary or permanent layoffs. According to the Center for Monitoring Indian Economy, with the start of the national lockdown, the unemployment rate has reached 23.5 percent in March to April 2020 with higher shares unemployed women. The unemployment rate for women has again reached 12.39 by cent as of February 2021.

Third, women in India are now facing a phantom pandemic where forced proximity, isolation, increased drug addiction, lack of access to justice, etc. during the ongoing health crisis have resulted in a growing threat of domestic and gender-based violence. . According to a data set released by the National Women’s Commission in April 2020, there were almost 100 percent increase in domestic violence during confinement.

Nonetheless, these are just a few of the immediate effects of the pandemic on women in India. Other sequential consequences will emerge over time, including issues of savings and asset depletion, pandemic widowhood, etc. which would make recovery extremely difficult for women.

Clearly, in India, the pandemic exploits pre-existing economic and social inequalities as well as social norms that give men embedded benefits, and poses a real threat to closing gender gaps. Indeed, according to the recent World Economic Forum Global Gender Gap Index, India has already lost 28 places to rank 140th out of 156 countries compared to its 112th position out of 153 countries for the year 2019-2020.

But despite a differential impact, women in India have not been included either directly or indirectly in developing response strategies to deal with COVID19. As such, they remain absent from the decision tables that involve shaping the future of our societies. However, research indicates that the inclusion of women as well as other diverse voices provides better options in shaping policy and achieving comprehensive results that address the needs and concerns of all groups.

How can an FFP help you?

These unfortunate situations demand an adjustment in India’s thinking and strategy, result in a paradigm shift in its traditional policymaking, and allow for diverse representation to effectively deal with the COVID19 pandemic. The current crisis is therefore precisely the time to talk about an FFP in India and for its representatives to commit more firmly to mainstreaming gender at the political level.

By reflecting critically on existing international power structures, an FFP framework focuses on protecting the needs of marginalized and female groups and places human security and human rights issues at the heart of discussions. In doing so, it provides a fundamental shift in conventional understanding of security to include other areas of foreign policy such as economics, finance, environment, health, trade, etc.

With this new perception of health risks and crisis management as a security threat, in light of the coronavirus pandemic, India has the potential to explore expanding humanitarian trade options under its agreements. international organizations to deal with drug shortages and lack of access to personal protective equipment for health. workers in its territory, a large majority of whom continue to be women.

Adopting an FFP could also pave the way for increased regional cooperation, facilitate regional discussions on a myriad of issues and enable the development of a targeted recovery program designed specifically for the empowerment of women. Such a program would take into account that the economic repercussions of crises disproportionately affect women and therefore help India enlist the help of its neighbor in dealing with the gendered economic and social effects of the COVID19 pandemic.

Furthermore, FFP does not only mean looking at power structures and managing relationships globally only, but also evaluating results in the country’s national landscape. In this sense, an FFP could provide India with an important starting point to bring about internal change by focusing more on gender issues, especially in terms of strictly defined patriarchal gender roles and removing the obstacles that continue to hold sway. restrict women’s participation in decision-making. process.

The emphasis on the participation of women in leadership positions in India would in turn catalyze the application of a gender lens to the national policy-making process, thus achieving comprehensive results that include diverse perspectives. These policies will promote women’s concerns as humanitarian issues, prioritize and protect the continuum of sexual and reproductive health and rights, and continue to facilitate the provision of information and education, thereby making women better equipped. to deal with the consequences of the pandemic.

Adding to these factors, since the FFP is a holistic approach, its application could also potentially strengthen cooperation between the Indian government and civil society organizations or women’s network at home and abroad to manage the pandemic and its deleterious effects on people, especially women. At a time when government resources are overwhelmed in their fight against the pandemic, greater involvement of civil society organizations can indeed play an essential role in the defense of social justice, women’s rights, social equity, and provide medical and food support, distribution of hygiene kits, awareness of the virus, etc. These efforts could bring a dramatic improvement in the vulnerable position of women in the context of the current Covid19 crisis in India.

Conclusion

As such, the FFP approach offers enormous potential to address some of the main institutional and organizational injustices against women in India, and the COVID19 pandemic represents a critical turning point in this regard. An FFP is important not only to ensure that the gender imbalances inflicted by COVID19 do not become permanent, but also for the long-term economic and social development of the country, the strengthening of democratic institutions and the advancement of national security as well. only peace. But it remains to be seen whether India will adopt or even consider moving towards an FFP in the near future.



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The political power behind Twitter against the Indian government https://ardud.ro/the-political-power-behind-twitter-against-the-indian-government/ https://ardud.ro/the-political-power-behind-twitter-against-the-indian-government/#respond Thu, 03 Jun 2021 07:00:46 +0000 https://ardud.ro/the-political-power-behind-twitter-against-the-indian-government/ A few hours before May 26, 2021, when the new 2021 rules relating to information technology (intermediate guidelines and code of ethics for digital media) entered into force, there was a multitude of reports and media posts on social networking sites and messaging services that platforms such as Twitter, Instagram and Facebook would be banned […]]]>


A few hours before May 26, 2021, when the new 2021 rules relating to information technology (intermediate guidelines and code of ethics for digital media) entered into force, there was a multitude of reports and media posts on social networking sites and messaging services that platforms such as Twitter, Instagram and Facebook would be banned the next day.

Apart from some Indian platforms like Koo, most of the major social networking sites had not yet met the requirements of the IT rules of 2021. A few days after May 26, some platforms publicly announced that they were taking action to comply with the new rules, while at least one platform challenged the constitutional validity of some provisions of the 2021 IT Regulation.

With much of India’s renamed transactional foreign policy likely to focus on strengthening US-Indian relations for some time At the time of writing, Indian Foreign Minister S. Jaishankar is in the United States to discuss, among other things, vaccines for India immediate bans are unlikely to stem from this non-compliance by US Big Tech companies.

However, IT rules are achieving their main purpose give the Indian state a vital legal weapon in the gradually escalating battle with big tech companies. Speculation about the platform ban and the ongoing standoff between Twitter and MEITY are just important side plots in this larger story.

Taming big technology

Since the disclosure of Cambridge Analytica’s use of Facebook to profile and manipulate users with political content, the Indian government has engaged in a series of ad hoc communications with major internet intermediaries. In July 2018, IT Minister Ravi Shankar Prasad, in a speech at the Rajya Sabha, warned that social media platforms cannot “escape their responsibility, accountability and responsibility. a broader commitment to ensure that their platforms are not widely used to disseminate incorrect facts. shown while the news is designed to incite people to commit crimes.

Ravi Shankar Prasad speaking to the media in New Delhi. Credit: PTI / Kamal Kishore / File photo

More worryingly, he said that if they don’t take adequate and swift action, then the law of complicity applies to them as well. The minister was speaking in response to the increase in the number of mass lynching incidents in India, apparently caused by the spread of false information inciting violence on social networks and messaging services. Comparing social media services to newspapers, Prasad further said that when there was provocative writing in the newspapers, the newspaper could not say it was not responsible.

Since that speech, we have seen a variety of policy proposals that ostensibly seek to hold the unbridled power of big tech companies to account. These include the strict data location requirements under old versions of data protection legislation, now significantly watered down; the requirements proposed under the draft policy on electronic commerce for companies to provide rapid access to data to law enforcement authorities as well as for the development of any industry; proposals for better access to non-personal data held by intermediaries. The 2021 IT Rules are the latest addition to this mix of policies.

At the center of these policy measures is the growing narrative of “data colonialism”. Users in the Global South generate data, which platform companies analyze and process in their home jurisdiction, reaping its economic dividends and bypassing regulatory oversight in other states where they operate. This behavior of Big Tech companies has been compared to private actors who have served as catalysts for colonialism in the past. However, it looks suspect when the narrative of “data colonialism” is championed by Mukesh Ambani, the richest person in the country, and Nandan Nilekani, the influential tech czar.

Twitter line

On closer inspection, what these policies seem to do is wrest control from the big tech companies, but instead of exploring ways to redistribute that power to users, they provide greater power to the state. and large local businesses.

Such a dynamic is visible in the immediate case: the Indian state has claimed that Twitter’s labeling of a BJP spokesperson’s tweet as “manipulated media” would jeopardize an ongoing police investigation. Twitter’s tagging of the tweet appears to be based on a fact-checking website whose investigation suggested that part of the tweet appeared to have been manipulated. The lack of transparency regarding the formal process Twitter took to ensure the decision was in line with its community guidelines highlights one of the most important issues we face when it comes to content regulation.

Platforms have far too much power and operate in a state of opacity that prevents complainants and respondents, as well as the general public, from understanding how and why they make decisions that impact freedom of expression.

However, the government’s claims also contradict its own regulatory positions. First, while there are legal provisions that allow the government to issue requests for removal of content, there is no legal provision under which it can request the removal of a label such as “manipulated media”. . Second, when regulatory efforts have been focused on imposing greater obligations on platforms to regulate harmful speech, it makes no sense to claim that they always have to wait until the end of police investigations before responding to speeches. hate or misinformation.

The use of visits from a special Delhi Police cell to deliver notices to the Twitter office continues the trend of ad hoc regulatory action often unmoved by the need for proportionality. It is not uncommon or unreasonable for regulators to demonstrate their enforcement powers as a means of obtaining compliance from large companies. However, such actions must clearly flow from the rule of law, procedural fairness and, to be both fair and effective, follow a regulatory pyramid of escalating sanctions rather than resorting to the most obvious form of intimidation. regulatory.

The unintended consequences of such thoughtless measures are immense, and the stakeholders who suffer the most are ordinary citizens. Again, little effort has been made to tackle the root of the regulatory problem – the lack of transparency. The obvious result of such measures would be more risk averse behavior on the part of platforms to avoid legal liability and evade regulatory scrutiny, with a negative impact on my and your freedom of expression online.

Amber Sinha is the Executive Director of the Center of Internet and Society. The author thanks Gurshabad Grover for his comments and editorial suggestions.



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Paytm’s Diversified Business Generates Huge Revenue, Leaving Competitors Telecom News, ET Telecom Behind https://ardud.ro/paytms-diversified-business-generates-huge-revenue-leaving-competitors-telecom-news-et-telecom-behind/ https://ardud.ro/paytms-diversified-business-generates-huge-revenue-leaving-competitors-telecom-news-et-telecom-behind/#respond Wed, 02 Jun 2021 11:15:00 +0000 https://ardud.ro/paytms-diversified-business-generates-huge-revenue-leaving-competitors-telecom-news-et-telecom-behind/ New Delhi: One97 Communications Limited, the parent company of the fintech giant, is heading for a $ 3 billion initial public offering (IPO), the highest initial IPO on record in India, and although the leader The market has established its presence in a plethora of companies, its competitors are only now exploring an expansion in […]]]>


New Delhi: One97 Communications Limited, the parent company of the fintech giant, is heading for a $ 3 billion initial public offering (IPO), the highest initial IPO on record in India, and although the leader The market has established its presence in a plethora of companies, its competitors are only now exploring an expansion in other services.

The company, which has long been a public limited company, is expected to be listed on the Indian Stock Exchange by November.

The company has taken advantage of its multi-payment architecture and is reporting revenue several times higher than any other company in the digital payments and financial services category.

“Paytm’s strong focus on merchants – merchant and inventory portfolio integrations, merchant point-of-sale, online payments and cross-selling to consumers have enabled Paytm to generate a strong revenue base through compared to its UPI-focused competitors. per active user, compared to its competing UPI-focused payment apps, ”said a recent report from global analytics firm Bernstein.

In India, while most fintech companies have so far targeted a particular business model, Paytm, led by Vijay Shekhar Sharma, has branched out from mobile, broadband, DTH top-ups and P2P transfers and now offers now a range of financial services.

Within the payments space, the company operates its wallet, banking services, UPI, postpaid services and much more. But it’s not just that. Paytm has added a plethora of businesses Paytm Payments Bank, Paytm Payments Gateway, Paytm Payout, Paytm Money to democratize wealth creation, Paytm Insurance, Paytm Postpaid, Paytm Credit Cards as well as utility bill payments, merchant payments offline, content and games. a service.

“With its presence in a large number of allied financial services, it (Paytm) has managed to become the largest player in terms of consolidated revenue. Additionally, an important distinction to note is that most of the ancillary services of Paytm are offered through in-house establishments such as Paytm Money, Paytm bank, etc. It may fare better in terms of margins in the times to come, ”said a recent report on RedSeer’s Indian fintech ecosystem.

Although it has established all of these businesses, its competitors are only now considering expansion into other services.

Paytm, with a first-mover advantage, has already become a leader and is a brand to be reckoned with.

“Paytm with its long heritage has a strong presence in” Bharat “ie level 3 and below as well as with a total of 20 million merchants on board it maintains a huge lead in wallet payments in particular, ”the report from market research firm RedSeer said.

The company is also a major player in UPI transactions in India. UPI transactions are not becoming a revenue-generating feature for third-party applications. “… maintaining UPI’s market share takes marketing dollars on a treadmill without generating revenue,” the Bernstein report said.

Instead, they go through a banking funnel, and this is where Paytm Payments Bank is already the highest recipient bank ahead of SBI, HDFC, and ICICI Bank.

The NPCI also proposed market capitalization in UPI transactions, where it said no player can have more than 30% market share by 2022. Players who violate the market share rule will be penalized.

However, for Paytm, UPI is just one of the services. Today, the business ends up managing the entire customer lifecycle and not just a payment transfer. All of this contributes to multiple revenue growth funnels for Paytm, whether through users, online merchants, or offline merchants.

The company also recorded more than 1.4 billion transactions reported in March with more than 20 million partner merchants accepting Paytm QR, Paytm IoT devices and App POS.

With the lockdown and restrictions across the country, users continue to turn to Paytm for all of their daily needs – mobile top-ups, broadband and DTH, credit card payments, utility bill payments, water bills, money transfers and more.



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Where so many see information overload, Pablo Boczkowski finds plenty https://ardud.ro/where-so-many-see-information-overload-pablo-boczkowski-finds-plenty/ https://ardud.ro/where-so-many-see-information-overload-pablo-boczkowski-finds-plenty/#respond Tue, 01 Jun 2021 18:09:12 +0000 https://ardud.ro/where-so-many-see-information-overload-pablo-boczkowski-finds-plenty/ Pablo J. Boczkowski is Professor Hamad Bin Khalifa Al-Thani at the Department of Communication Studies at Northwestern University, where he directs the school of communication Latinx Digital Media Center. A pioneer in global communication studies whose work transcends borders, focusing on people, their cultures, their habits and their rituals, Boczkowski also co-directs the Center for […]]]>


Pablo J. Boczkowski is Professor Hamad Bin Khalifa Al-Thani at the Department of Communication Studies at Northwestern University, where he directs the school of communication Latinx Digital Media Center. A pioneer in global communication studies whose work transcends borders, focusing on people, their cultures, their habits and their rituals, Boczkowski also co-directs the Center for Media and Society Studies in Argentina, his birthplace and the inspiration for much of his scholarship.

The most recent and personal of his books to date, “Abundance: On the Experience of Living in a World of Information Plenty,” recently published by Oxford University Press, was heavily influenced by Boczkowski’s daughters. Sofia, now 20, is currently finishing her sophomore year at Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences, and Emma, ​​17, will be a senior at Evanston Township High School next year. The book’s proceeds support the Marsha P. Johnson Award, the first of its kind in the School of Communication (SoC), which was created to recognize students who demonstrate leadership and / or advance the conversation about LGBTQ + through their scientific work, their teaching or their research. The first recipient of the award will be announced at the SoC convocation on June 13, 2021.

Boczkowski spoke to Northwestern Now about Argentina, the research and its children, and how they are connected.

Q: We know a lot about information overload in the digital age. What is “abundance”?

The idea behind “information overload” is that there is an optimal level of information that any person or group of people can process to make a particular decision, and that any additional information beyond that is a burden. and, therefore, has negative consequences. . Applied to the digital world, this idea assumes two false premises. The first is the emphasis on decision making: most people use the information they get through home screens, social media platforms, and news and entertainment channels primarily to make decisions. I realized during the research phase of this project that most people use this information primarily to express themselves, connect with others, and manage and make sense of their life in general rather than making decisions.

Second, while it is true that very often people feel surrounded, and sometimes even overwhelmed, by information, there is no optimal level of information that applies to all levels, and to have it. much does not necessarily have negative implications. On the contrary, it is sometimes a welcome addition to everyday life. To help make sense of how individuals experience our world of information abundance, in the book I propose a shift from information overload to abundance, a more descriptive term unloaded with the implications of ‘a discourse of deficit and in which the value of having more or more less information is something that emerges from the context in which the information is received and the purposes for which it is used.

Q: Why Argentina?

There are three issues that make Argentina an ideal setting for the argument presented in this book, and all three have to do with what separates Argentina from the global North in general, and the United States, in particular.

First, unlike the Far North, where much of the research on information overload issues has been undertaken, Argentina is in the throes of economic hardship. Despite widespread poverty, access to and use of information devices and services has been very high. As I write in the book, “a situation of greater material scarcity helps to understand when, how and why people can value information so much that they are willing to devote a significant portion of their income to it.”

Second, Argentina has historically had a very strong associative culture in which friendship is sort of an art form. “So,” as I write in the book, “the Argentinian context helps to highlight and make visible the importance of a [social connectivity] which withdraws into the background and loses a certain visibility in societies marked by more individualistic and utilitarian associative cultures.

Third, there are the issues of trust in publicized information, especially with regard to fake news, disinformation and disinformation in modern democratic life. Mistrust of information disseminated on traditional, digital and social media has grown around the world and Argentines are among the most suspicious. As I write in the book, “to deal with this situation, many Argentines have become very skeptical and… have developed critical reception and sociability practices to try to determine what they consider to be the real news. behind the news… Argentina provides a sort of avant-garde to examine the character of agentic media reception and put into perspective the hypodermic needle nightmares commonly associated with the abundance of contemporary information.

You write in the acknowledgments of the book: “There I was, a single dad with an Argentinian outlook and 20th century sensibility, trying to parent two teenage girls in the heart of the United States who embody a 21st century outlook on life. Of all the differences in position and culture that have marked this process, our respective experiences in the information world have been one of the most disheartening for me, as the part of their emotional and daily life is at stake in the process. digital environment. Listening to them and learning from their worldviews laid the foundation for a beautiful bridge that the three of us built to connect our perspectives and transformed us in the process.

Q: Your work on the book coincided with the teenage years of your daughters, Sofia and Emma. How did the experience of this project help you make sense of their world?

The book project lasted nearly five years, which coincided with the education of two teenage girls. During that time, I was genuinely intrigued by the way they navigate the news world, primarily through digital media. Their perspectives and practices were very different from mine. So, I asked them a lot of questions about what they were doing in this regard, what things meant to them, etc. and sometimes I threw them some ideas emerging from the analysis of the book. Over time, as I write in the acknowledgments, I realized that it ends up building a bridge between their worldview and mine, which was a wonderful and unexpected outcome of the reading process!

Q: Your recent study of newspapers that stubbornly remain in five very different countries despite the overwhelming digital shift is a unique and nuanced exploration of media consumption as a ritual on a large scale. What sets your work apart?

My research program over the past decade and a half has taken a global and comparative turn, exploring the dynamics of media consumption and the use of technology in different parts of the world. I believe that all social science studies need to be contextualized instead of assuming that what happens in one context applies to all others – which is the default position of a lot of research in and on the Global North. , especially in the United States.

By doing benchmarking, you can determine what might be unique about a given phenomenon in a country and what might be shared between countries, and account for both the presence and absence of patterns. common. While most comparative research on media consumption and technology use uses quantitative techniques (as I did in my previous book project “The News Gap,” MIT Press, 2013), the gist of my most recent work has been based on qualitative methodologies. The document you mention was based on 488 interviews with media consumers conducted in five countries: Argentina, Finland, Israel, Japan and the United States. Qualitative comparative work in the social sciences, especially on this scale, is very rare and sets my research program apart from most of the relevant scholarships available. It takes a lot of coordination, patience and curiosity about other cultures. Doing this work together with great colleagues who have become dear friends not only makes it professionally possible, but also very rewarding personally.

Q: What’s the one thing you hope readers will take away from the book?

The agency that all of us who are users of the technologies behind this current phase of information abundance have to shape the way we use these devices, interpret the content we access through them, and collectively affect our society. Despite the dominant dystopian, if not apocalyptic, rhetoric often associated with these technologies, we have a lot of power in determining our destiny, and it is important that we take this stance and all together build a more equitable and sustainable future.

Q: Argentina has been devastated by a second wave of COVID-19 in recent weeks, pushing the remote country to the top of the list for the highest per capita death toll. As an expert on disinformation and public opinion, can you talk about what is happening in Argentina?

One thing I can say from a research perspective is that this is not a case of anti-vaccination sentiment or reluctance to vaccinate. We measured vaccine reluctance in October 2019 as part of a larger disinformation study, and preliminary analyzes indicate it was extremely low, and has remained so since the start of the pandemic. based on a survey conducted by a colleague from the Universidad de San Andres two months ago.

In other words, if the country had the same level of access to vaccines as the United States and had started the vaccination campaigns at the same time as we did here in the United States, it is likely that the vaccination process would have prevented this dire situation. . Because access to vaccines appears to be linked to patterns of global economic inequality, the current situation once again reminds us of the need to work together among nations to address the persistent inequalities between rich countries and the rest of the world. world. This need becomes particularly pressing during major crises such as the current COVID-19 pandemic.



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Canadians want government to ‘beat the hammer’ on business in the fight against climate change https://ardud.ro/canadians-want-government-to-beat-the-hammer-on-business-in-the-fight-against-climate-change/ https://ardud.ro/canadians-want-government-to-beat-the-hammer-on-business-in-the-fight-against-climate-change/#respond Mon, 31 May 2021 20:49:36 +0000 https://ardud.ro/canadians-want-government-to-beat-the-hammer-on-business-in-the-fight-against-climate-change/ A growing number of Canadians do not believe in free market solutions and want the government to step in with stricter regulations in the fight against climate change. New survey data, released Monday by the Canadian Center for Society Purposes (CCPC), revealed that Canadians’ attitudes towards corporate responsibility have changed over the past year. According […]]]>


A growing number of Canadians do not believe in free market solutions and want the government to step in with stricter regulations in the fight against climate change.

New survey data, released Monday by the Canadian Center for Society Purposes (CCPC), revealed that Canadians’ attitudes towards corporate responsibility have changed over the past year.

According to the survey, two-thirds of Canadians now believe governments need to get tougher on Canadian businesses with laws, regulations and taxes to tackle issues of climate change and inequality.

The survey was conducted over the course of a week in May, among 1,500 Canadians. It follows an earlier poll, conducted last year, which found that growing numbers of Canadians are calling on government and business to do more to tackle social inequalities in Canada.

This feeling has increased dramatically as Covid-19 pandemic focused on, the latest findings of the investigation. More than ever, Canadians want governments to force companies to reduce their carbon footprints and tackle environmental issues.

“Canadians want a more equitable, inclusive and environmentally sustainable economic system,” said Brian Gallant, CEO of the CCPC and former Premier of New Brunswick. “They want to see the government knocking the hammer down on business as a necessity to make this a reality.”

Governments and businesses in Canada have faced many pressures to step up the fight against climate change.

Throughout the pandemic, the federal government has reiterated its promise to support big business in condition they strive to reduce their carbon footprint.

He also pledged to bring Canada to net zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, while many of the country’s biggest companies – even some of the biggest pollutants, including Suncor Energy Inc. and Air Canada – have followed suit.

But setting goals is only a fraction of the battle, critics say.

Over the past three decades, Canada has set several targets to reduce emissions and has not yet met a single.

Studies have found that the country’s disproportionate carbon footprint, which comes largely from Canada’s oil and gas sector, is hampering the government’s net zero goals. And in Toronto and the Greater Toronto Area, carbon emissions are steadily increasing with no sign of decreasing.

Tonya Surman, CEO of the Center for Social Innovation, said the Toronto-based nonprofit has more than 300 startups in its membership dedicated to driving social change, many of which produce and market clean technology.

The organization’s environmental initiatives program, Climate Ventures, seeks to find solutions to the climate crisis through entrepreneurship.

“As the harsh realities of inequality and climate change become increasingly visible, other sectors are mobilizing to join the movement,” said Surman. “It’s a real ‘now or never’ moment.”

Despite pressure from the business community, the latest research from the CCPC indicates a growing impatience among Canadians to wait for business-led solutions.

Almost 60 percent of respondents said capitalism in Canada should be “reformed” to be more inclusive and sustainable, while 16 percent said they felt the system was broken.

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Gallant said the responses marked a rejection of hope that the country’s problems will be solved through free market innovation.

“The message is clear: there is an appetite for government intervention,” Gallant said. “And if you’re in the business of business and think this is the right approach, then great. But if you don’t, then we would say now is the time to step up, proactively, before governments really feel compelled to force companies to act.



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Covid-19 and recovering from the first wave of the pandemic https://ardud.ro/covid-19-and-recovering-from-the-first-wave-of-the-pandemic/ https://ardud.ro/covid-19-and-recovering-from-the-first-wave-of-the-pandemic/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 23:01:30 +0000 https://ardud.ro/covid-19-and-recovering-from-the-first-wave-of-the-pandemic/ Corruption does not discriminate. No one is immune. Everyone is fair whether you are connected to a high ranking politician or powerful family or work in local government or even an individual. Minors working in deplorable conditions are nothing new. Alan Paton wrote about this in “Cry the Beloved Country” and this gripping book has […]]]>


Corruption does not discriminate. No one is immune. Everyone is fair whether you are connected to a high ranking politician or powerful family or work in local government or even an individual. Minors working in deplorable conditions are nothing new. Alan Paton wrote about this in “Cry the Beloved Country” and this gripping book has been around for decades. It is now part of school programs.

South Africa’s mines have been part of the fabric of consciousness, of the landscape of this country since the cogs of apartheid were set in motion. Nothing has changed and yet it seems on the surface that everything has changed. You hear about these stories every day and you get so numb about them and at the end of the day you realize that there is nothing really you can do in a constructive way except keep the faith that things will gradually evolve on their own in the direction of the worst conditions for the best.

Of course, my heart bleeds for them, these miners. They are just humans. They have families, wives and children. But that’s not the first thing people see when they open a newspaper in the morning with their coffee. For them miners, employment is employment, it is employment (they don’t see it as anything else) and that is why education is so important. Conditioning should not be approached or implemented as a “just cause”.

Sensitive and emotionally mature people will not be afraid of the problems of the day that need to be addressed, not just for the sake of solving them. Changing anything today is a revolutionary mission, but it is a mission that begins with clarity of vision, equality, respect and recognition of communities at the grassroots level in the process of becoming. (I hope I answered your question as well as possible. Please feel free to continue this line of discussion).

No, and I must say it with great emphasis. Service delivery in rural areas, townships where unemployment is high, skills development is low, non-existent and therefore nothing comes out of the government of the day except that it seems empty promises when local elections are held. There is crime, criminal syndicates operating in the big cities. Clean running water, sanitation, waste disposal and electricity should be high on the priority list as they concern the poorest of the poor; the majority of the population lives in misery, in slums, raising their children, families literally on bread and water. What kind of society treats its most vulnerable citizens so unfairly? Children raise children. Sisters and brothers play the role of the absent parent in the lives of their younger siblings and it is a travesty the legacy of HIV / AIDS has left behind.

Xenophobia is a large scale diabolical injustice in South Africa. It is pure evil what humanity is capable of doing to itself physically, emotionally and mentally. It is unnatural and disturbing to see this level of poverty, crime and death as a result of the “rainbow nation” and the “African renaissance”. People are selfish, self-centered, and forgiving, but what they don’t realize is that the world owes them nothing. We are so consumed by money, cars, jobs, visions of fame and wealth, and personal success. You have to fight your way through this world even though mountains like punishment and stage fright stare at you around every turn, around every corner with snake eyes.

The world we live in today is a world filled with madness, with desperation wide open and it is like a fire shooting at your heart, the pathways of the nerves that connect to your consciousness; the effects, the torments of depression and mental illness are everywhere visible. Its existence can no longer be furiously hidden and denied. On the outside everything shines, but inside there is always the urgency of freedom and a living and breathing self-awareness. I feel, for this nation.

I did not deliberately decide to leave apartheid or not to talk about it. In the end, it happened that way. It was not a conscious decision. It was only when I entered into this conversation with you that I realized how much I was playing a role of “ witness ” to this / these heinous crimes committed, in the name of the law of the land of this land. , back in the days when apartheid was what people thought would triumph over the weak, crippled and destitute in its heyday.

Apartheid deserves a book of its own. A subject under the sun that I feel I will tackle as I mature more and more as a writer. It will be difficult. There is so much rage, heartache, a visceral disconnect between the people who were the “privileged minority” during apartheid and then there was the “shameful majority” who lived stuck in the trenches of poverty and death. . There are a lot of things, themes of South Africa that I knew as a child and that I left aside (the poetry book Africa where you are), when I look at the book in retrospect. Yes, you’re right. We could have said a lot more. Maybe I should have talked about it; the life experience of a majority living in a perpetual state of feelings of anxiety, deep humiliation, self-awareness and apartheid closed in on me, all facets, all aspects and abstracts of my childhood, my adolescence and my youth. Not just me but a whole country. On the one hand, it was flourishing and on the other hand, it was a complete paradigm shift; in other words, the infinite good on one side versus the residing evil. I didn’t want to repeat the negative, the negative, the negative because it was omnipresent in all spheres, kingdom, empire, castle wall, ivory tower on which apartheid was built. If I had a book of hellish negatives (as a writer you can’t work in this oppressive, claustrophobic realm, I mean I can’t deliver what I feel is my best work) how people would be they attracted to it? did I ask myself over and over again?

Come to think of it, I’m glad I didn’t pay any “homage” to apartheid in my first book. The market here (South Africa) is saturated with books on this subject. Nobody talks about Africa, the continent, the people, the inhabitants in a way that I feel like in my first book. I’m happy with the book, but can a writer or poet really say he’s completely happy or thinks it’s over? You always want to go back and change something and there is always something that doesn’t satisfy you in the end, but in a way it’s also liberating to feel, speak, act, react to for the cause of justice and emancipation.



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The Islamabad Consensus – Journal https://ardud.ro/the-islamabad-consensus-journal/ https://ardud.ro/the-islamabad-consensus-journal/#respond Sun, 30 May 2021 02:19:53 +0000 https://ardud.ro/the-islamabad-consensus-journal/ SOME positive news about the economy is finally on the horizon. If official figures are to be believed, Pakistan will end the current fiscal year with GDP growth of almost 4%. Economic decision-makers deserve a pat on the back for causing minimal economic growth despite the severe global economic recession following the Covid-19 pandemic. Yet […]]]>


SOME positive news about the economy is finally on the horizon. If official figures are to be believed, Pakistan will end the current fiscal year with GDP growth of almost 4%. Economic decision-makers deserve a pat on the back for causing minimal economic growth despite the severe global economic recession following the Covid-19 pandemic. Yet the pandemic has fundamentally transformed economic thinking around the world. In order to capitalize on these positive economic figures and address Pakistan’s unique economic challenges, now is the time to forge a new consensus – the Islamabad Consensus, if you will – on policy recommendations for Pakistan.

The old consensus on economic policy, or the Washington Consensus, focused on reducing state participation in economic decision-making, especially for countries in the South. The World Bank and the IMF, institutions that have imposed this consensus throughout the developing world, saw fiscal policy as the problem, while qualifying monetary policy as the only legitimate political tool of economic management. Central bank independence was an extension of this thinking, as it was believed that an autonomous central bank effectively prevented a state from injecting fiscal stimulus. For this reason, from the 1990s there was a general movement towards monetary policy tools and greater autonomy for central banks all over the world. The global economic slowdown due to the Covid-19 pandemic, however, has shattered the Washington consensus.

Covid-19 demolished the old consensus.

As all countries face the biggest global economic recession since the Great Depression, fiscal policy is back in force. Recently, Jerome Powell, Chairman of the Federal Reserve, spoke about the effectiveness of using monetary and fiscal measures for economic management. Andrew Bailey, Governor of the Bank of England, called for “very close and sensible coordination” between monetary and fiscal policies. Even Kristalina Georgieva, IMF chief and true guardian of the Washington Consensus, called for more fiscal action. Globally, more than $ 16 trillion has been injected from the budget side to support economies.

The countries of the Global South pay particular attention. Recognizing the need for fiscal policy to spur economic growth, Latin American countries are trying to defend themselves against the remnants of the Washington consensus. In the case of Argentina, Vice-President Cristina Kirchner called for the postponement of talks with the IMF. Similar voices are also heard in Mexico under President Andréas Obrador.

Covid-19 has also been an outright economic disaster for Pakistan, especially as it has exacerbated Pakistan’s fundamental economic problems: sluggish economic growth, lack of job creation and rampant incidence of poverty. Pakistani policymakers must come together to abandon the Washington consensus and develop a new consensus that seeks to resolve Pakistan’s fundamental economic problems through fiscal policy. In doing so, Pakistani policymakers will need to find new ways to use fiscal tools to boost economic growth, create jobs and reduce poverty.

One innovative intervention to address key economic issues is to dramatically increase spending on social protection initiatives from around Rs 416 billion in the current fiscal year to something like Rs 800 billion in the next budget. The poor have a higher marginal propensity to consume, which means they spend a much higher share of their extra income on consumption, thereby putting the extra money back into the economy. In addition, thanks to the multiplier effect, the final impact of this spending will be much greater as the initial spending moves through the economy. This will not only boost economic growth, but also create more jobs as the economy recovers, while reducing the incidence of poverty, as money goes directly into the pockets of the poor.

Covid-19 demolished the old consensus on economic policy. Countries are increasingly resisting difficult IMF conditions and are pursuing fiscal policies everywhere. It is absolutely necessary to develop a new consensus on economic policy that seeks to resolve Pakistan’s fundamental economic problems such as sluggish economic growth, lack of job creation and persistent poverty through fiscal policy. One innovative way in which economic policymakers in Pakistan can tackle these fundamental economic issues is to substantially increase budget spending on social protection initiatives in the next budget. Let there be consensus!

The writer completed his doctorate on a Fulbright scholarship. He teaches economics and public policy at Habib University in Karachi.

aqdas.afzal@gmail.com

Posted in Dawn on May 30, 2021



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