Town in Romania – Ardud http://ardud.ro/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 11:23:51 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ardud.ro/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png Town in Romania – Ardud http://ardud.ro/ 32 32 Minister Gulyás: Our policy is to build alliances – at home and abroad https://ardud.ro/minister-gulyas-our-policy-is-to-build-alliances-at-home-and-abroad/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 11:10:51 +0000 https://ardud.ro/minister-gulyas-our-policy-is-to-build-alliances-at-home-and-abroad/ In an interview published Monday with hirado.hu, Gergely Gulyás, minister in the Prime Minister’s Office, said the goal of their policy is to form an alliance, not to stand out. Moreover, he also spoke about the politics of the opposition in Brussels. EU, Hungary and Budapest Paradoxically, the main task is to show that we […]]]>

In an interview published Monday with hirado.hu, Gergely Gulyás, minister in the Prime Minister’s Office, said the goal of their policy is to form an alliance, not to stand out. Moreover, he also spoke about the politics of the opposition in Brussels.

EU, Hungary and Budapest

Paradoxically, the main task is to show that we want to join the queue. So we don’t appreciate isolation per se, even though we have gained experience and there is some beauty to it – there are so many examples of heroic isolation in history and literature Hungarians – but our policy is to form alliances – at home and abroad. We want a strong European Union of strong nations and a strong Central Europe. We are never proud to be alone in EU debates, and we regret it when we have to be alone, but it is essential if we want to prevent decisions that ignore Hungary’s interests, said Minister in an interview with hirado.hu.

Gergely Gulyás said, among other things, that it is impossible to replace Russian oil with another, despite the fact that the government has done everything in its power in recent years to guarantee alternative energy sources. . Diversifying energy sources has been a constant goal for Hungary since the regime change more than three decades ago, he said.

“While Hungary’s post-communist governments all pretended to promote diversification, we were the ones who did the most…While the country could only import gas from Austria and Ukraine when we came to power in 2010, we now have interconnections with six of our countries. seven neighbours,” he said.

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“The problem is that over the last thirty years, Europe has failed to meet the demand for alternative sources of raw materials and energy,” Gulyás said. “Until alternative sources are in place, we will be heavily dependent on Russian oil and gas. Once the Greek-Bulgarian interconnection is finally completed. we will also have the possibility of importing gas from Azerbaijan.

He said the government understood that the EU could not turn a blind eye to Russia’s aggression. Because the government did not want to break the bloc’s unity over its response, Hungary backed the first five sanctions packages against Russia, he noted. But when the sixth package was presented after member states reached consensus on rejecting the possibility of an energy embargo at the Versailles summit, Hungary had no choice but to make it clear that it was dependent on Russian oil for security of its energy supply, Gulyas added.

He also said the government wants Hungary to catch up with the standard of living in Western Europe. “This has been the objective of Hungarian policies since the regime change, and we have made great strides towards this goal over the past decades. We are still doing everything we can to keep it going. Gulyás said the average wage under previous socialist governments was lower than the current minimum wage, and living standards had increased over the past decade.

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Central Europe must maintain the competitive advantage it has over Western Europe in areas such as public safety, social peace, its opposition to immigration and the view that parents are right to think that their children could have a better life than theirs, Gulyás said.

He noted that Hungary’s GDP is 74% of the EU average, with the country overtaking Portugal. “But we have to keep moving forward, and the aim is to reach the EU average for the foreseeable future,” he said. “And if we continue at the pace we were in the previous government cycle, then – despite all the difficulties, the war and the recovery from the pandemic – we will also have reason to be satisfied with this cycle. ”

Regarding the Municipality of Budapest and Mayor Gergely Karácsony, Gulyás said that the government respects the rights and autonomy of local governments, as enshrined in the Basic Law. The government does not intend to force the municipality’s hand on contentious issues, “although we could go further if the relationship between the government and the municipality were not determined by party lines”, did he declare.

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European Opposition Policy

Gulyás called on the opposition to stop “trying to block agreements between Hungary and the EU at every moment, such as the agreement on the [pandemic] recovery fund and the 2021-2027 financial framework. These actions “do not harm the government but rather the teachers and doctors, whose salary increases would be financed by the funds”. He continued: “Whether it is a question of heart or color, we would welcome the opportunity to present a common political position on these issues. The first sign would be that the left-wing MEPs and their colleagues from the groups they defend stop stubbornly preventing Brussels from giving us the money to which we are entitled from the European Union under European law. EU, including money for teachers’ salary increases and doctors’ salary increases.

He said the government would welcome a cross-party stance on the issue, as “a first sign that the left-leaning MEPs and members of their party groups, whom they have sacked, will stop undermining our chances of receiving the funds of the EU to which we are entitled”. .”

Asked about the recently introduced windfall tax on large corporations, Gulyás said the current economic climate was determined by the recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, which caused inflation, and the war in Ukraine, which has exacerbated. Wartime inflation has a visible impact on the economy, and “it is still impossible to know how far it will go because no one can predict when the war will end,” he said.

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“The conservative and balanced economic policy pursued by the Hungarian government is the most effective response to this,” he said. “We are asking high-profit sectors, where profits have often increased during the crisis, to increase their share of the tax burden,” he stressed, adding that this is the reason for this, that they have a good chance of maintaining the budget deficit. to 4.9% this year, and that although the risks to the global economy next year are greater than at any time in recent decades, it is still quite realistic that they can reduce the budget deficit at 3.5%.

Thanks to these measures, Hungary is unlikely to exceed a budget deficit of 4.9% in 2022 and hopefully reduce it to 3.5% next year, despite the risks in the global economy, a- he declared.

Meanwhile, the government will increase child benefit funding and protect its utility fee reduction scheme, he said.

Featured image via Noémi Bruzák/MTI

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IIPA JKRB Hosts 9th Shri Ram Sahai Memorial Lecture https://ardud.ro/iipa-jkrb-hosts-9th-shri-ram-sahai-memorial-lecture/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 18:23:32 +0000 https://ardud.ro/iipa-jkrb-hosts-9th-shri-ram-sahai-memorial-lecture/ Jammu, June 26: “We are on borrowed time and it is time for all of us to pull ourselves together and change our attitude towards education, skills, industrial growth and employment,” said Prof (Dr) Neharika Vohra, Vice Chancellor Delhi Skill and Entrepreneurship University, New Delhi during the presentation of the 9th Shri Ram Sahai Memorial […]]]>

Jammu, June 26: “We are on borrowed time and it is time for all of us to pull ourselves together and change our attitude towards education, skills, industrial growth and employment,” said Prof (Dr) Neharika Vohra, Vice Chancellor Delhi Skill and Entrepreneurship University, New Delhi during the presentation of the 9th Shri Ram Sahai Memorial Lecture on “Bridging the Skills Gap through Industry-Academia Partnership” organized by the Indian Institute of Public Administration, Branch regional of JK.

While raising concerns about the quality of human capital, the skills gap and unemployable graduates, Professor Vohra made a strong case that academia and industry can no longer be complacent, and should pool their efforts and present to address the issue of talent depth in the country. According to her, the education sector should rethink and design an effective curriculum through intensive collaboration with industry to define the skills required at a detailed level. In addition, there is a need to develop indicators to measure basic employability skill levels, to create, adapt and develop new assessment methods that reflect learners’ basic vocational skills and competences. .

Further emphasizing the role of industry in bridging the skills gap, she said industry should be willing to come into the classroom, engage with students, provide internship opportunities, co-create a program that concerns them. According to her, industry should pay a premium for skills and therefore appropriate incentives for training and learning should be visible. The industry needs to move away from lazy categorizations of talent and recognize skilled labor.

Dr. Ashok Bhan, IPS (Retd), Patron of IIPA-JKRB while remembering the contributions of the late Sh. Ram Sahai said he was a charismatic and seasoned entrepreneur who was well ahead of his time and contributed to matters of social interest. He said unemployment among educated people is a matter of grave concern and suggested that appropriate interventions be made by universities and industry to address this problem which affects the country’s youth.

BR Sharma, IAS (Retd), President of IIPA-JKRB in his presidential remarks while paying tribute to Sh. Sahai, said the vision of India becoming a $5 trillion economy is only possible ‘with the synergistic and systematic effort of policy makers, educational institutions and industry. He said that our country’s skills landscape is immense and that through intelligence forecasting and modeling, the vision can be realized.

KB Jandial, IAS (Retd.), Director (Seminars), IIPA JKRB paid a glowing tribute to Late Sh. Ram Sahaï. He said that as a founding member of the branch, Sh. Sahai has made immense contributions in bringing forward trade and commerce issues and this commemorative conference is held every year to carry forward his legacy in deliberating on matters relevant to the industry.

Rahul Sahai, in his closing remarks, said that in an ever-changing world, instilling constant experiential learning is key to developing the human capital of the future. He assured that as a member of an industry association, he will forge fruitful relationships with academia and provide students with meaningful opportunities that will benefit local industry and society as a whole. He thanked the IIPA for organizing this commemorative conference each year in memory of his father.

Earlier, Prof. Alka Sharma, Secretary of IIPA JKRB delivered the official welcome speech and the proceedings were led by Dr. Anil Gupta, Co-Secretary.

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With the annulment of Roe v. Wade, corporations remain silent on abortion https://ardud.ro/with-the-annulment-of-roe-v-wade-corporations-remain-silent-on-abortion/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 00:50:20 +0000 https://ardud.ro/with-the-annulment-of-roe-v-wade-corporations-remain-silent-on-abortion/ The companies had more than a month to formulate a response to the end of federal abortion rights in the United States, if they did not weigh in immediately after a draft notice leaked in May. But when the final decision came Friday in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, relatively few people had anything […]]]>

The companies had more than a month to formulate a response to the end of federal abortion rights in the United States, if they did not weigh in immediately after a draft notice leaked in May.

But when the final decision came Friday in Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, relatively few people had anything to say about the outcome.

Most have remained silent, including some companies known to speak out on social issues such as Black Lives Matter and LGBTQ rights. Some of the companies that blacked out their Instagram pages in 2020 or displayed rainbow flags on their websites for Pride Month have so far been reluctant to comment on abortion.

“Executives are feeling some trepidation about this,” said Dave Fleet, head of global digital crisis at Edelman, a consulting firm. “They worry about backlash because they know there’s no way to please everyone.”

Many of the companies that made public statements on Friday chose to address how the Supreme Court’s decision would affect their workers’ access to health care. In some cases, they avoided the word “abortion” altogether, perhaps aiming for a more palatable answer.

“We have processes in place so that an employee who may not be able to access care in one location is provided with affordable coverage to receive similar levels of care in another location,” wrote the Disney executives in a memo to staff, adding that this included “family planning.” (including decisions related to pregnancy).

Other companies that came forward on Friday to say they would cover employee travel costs for abortions include Warner Bros., Condé Nast, BuzzFeed, Vox Media, Goldman Sachs, Snap, Macy’s, Intuit and Dick’s Sporting Goods. They joined a group including Starbucks, Tesla, Yelp, Airbnb, Netflix, Patagonia, DoorDash, JPMorgan Chase, Levi Strauss & Co., PayPal, OKCupid, Citigroup, Kroger, Google, Microsoft, Paramount, Nike, Chobani, Lyft and Reddit which had previously implemented similar policies.

“The employer is how many people enter the health care system,” added Mr. Fleet. “You see companies looking inward first.”

A few companies accompanied these policy changes with statements. Roger Lynch, the head of Condé Nast, called the decision “a blow to reproductive rights”. Lyft said the decision would “harm millions of women.” BuzzFeed CEO Jonah Peretti called it “regressive and awful.” Some business leaders have also spoken out, with Bill Gates, the co-founder and former head of Microsoft, calling the decision “an unfair and unacceptable setback”, and Sheryl Sandberg, the former chief operating officer of Meta, writing that she “threatens to undo the progress women have made in the workplace.

But many companies that have spoken out on social issues like racism did not respond to requests for comment or declined to comment after the Supreme Court ruling, including Target, Walmart, Coca-Cola, Delta and Wendy’s. Hobby Lobby, which in 2014 successfully sued the Supreme Court to challenge whether employer-provided health care should include contraception, declined to comment on the Dobbs decision.

In recent years, there has been a growing expectation that corporations will intervene on political and social issues. The share of American adults online who believe businesses have a responsibility to participate in debates on current issues has increased over the past year, according to consumer research firm Forrester. The expectation is even more pronounced among younger social media users, according to research from Sprout Social.

When George Floyd was killed by police in 2020, public companies and their foundations committed more than $49 billion to fight racial inequality. Last year, after Georgia’s Republican-led legislature restricted voter access, some CEOs, including of Coca-Cola and Delta Air Lines, criticized the law, and 72 black business leaders issued a letter urging business leaders to “publicly oppose discriminatory legislation”. ”

With abortion, public opinion is a bit different: Forrester found that fewer respondents believed companies should take a stance on abortion. Polls have always found that a majority of Americans think abortion should be legal in all or most cases, but a recent Pew Research Center survey found that people had widely varying opinions on morality on the matter. Companies fear the backlash that could result from taking a stand on the issue.

“Of the range of politicized issues in the sphere of brand impact, few are as contentious and deeply personal as abortion,” said Mike Proulx, vice president and research director at Forrester. .

Political engagement is rarely a simple choice for business leaders. Disney, which had long shunned partisan politics, faced backlash this year when it failed to take a strong stance on Florida’s “Don’t Say Gay” law, but Florida lawmakers have then revoked its special tax benefits. John Gibson, chief executive of gaming company Tripwire Interactive, was quickly replaced after speaking out in favor of banning abortion in Texas after six weeks of pregnancy.

A 2020 study of 149 companies published in the Journal of Marketing found that corporate activism had a negative effect on a company’s stock performance, although it found a positive effect on sales if the activism was consistent with the company’s consumer values.

Getting involved and deciding not to get involved can have a price.

“You have to be careful not to learn the wrong lessons from some of these moments,” said Mr. Fleet, of Edelman. “It would be very easy to look at companies that have made missteps and say ‘well, we shouldn’t say anything’, when in fact some customers don’t say anything, that’s the mistake that was made. committed.”

Some companies on Friday warned staff to be careful how they discuss the decision in the workplace. “There will be intense public debate over this decision,” Citigroup’s human resources manager wrote to staff. “Remember that we should always treat each other with respect, even when our opinions differ.”

Meta said publicly on Friday that it would reimburse employees for travel expenses to have abortions. But the company then told its employees not to openly discuss the court’s decision over wide-reaching communication channels inside the company, according to three employees, citing a policy that put “strong guards -body around social, political and sensitive conversations” in the workplace.

But there are other companies that haven’t been shy about making more outspoken statements about abortion, and they’re urging other companies to follow their tone and commitment.

OkCupid sent a notification to app users in states with abortion restrictions encouraging them to reach out to their elected officials to support abortion. Melissa Hobley, its global marketing director, has worked behind the scenes to get other female business leaders to pledge support for abortion.

“We had to say screw the risk,” she said. “It’s an economic issue, it’s a marketing issue. If you’re in highly visible, highly competitive industries like tech, law, finance, you’re all fighting after female talent.

Jeremy Stoppelman, Yelp’s chief executive, said he felt it was important to speak out on access to abortion whether or not there was a business case, even though he knew that some users would object to this decision.

“Certainly when you speak out on these issues not everyone will agree,” he said. “Looking at that, we felt pretty strongly that it was the right thing to do,” adding, “it’s been 50 years of established law.”

Some business leaders have expressed concern about how restrictions on abortion will affect their ability to recruit workers, especially those whose companies are based in the 13 states that will ban abortion immediately or very quickly with the cancellation of Roe. These states include Texas, where tech companies have flocked in recent years.

Research commissioned by the Tara Health Foundation found that two-thirds of college-educated workers surveyed would be discouraged from taking a job in Texas because of its restrictive abortion law and would not apply for jobs in other states that have passed similar laws.

“Employers like us can be the last line of defense,” said Sarah Jackel, chief operating officer of Civitech, a 55-person Texas-based company that builds technology tools for political campaigns. The company pledged to cover travel expenses for employees needing an abortion immediately after the passage of the Texas ban, SB 8.

Ms Jackel said the policy had strong support from employees and investors, although the company declined to share whether anyone had used it.

“It’s a good deal,” she added. “There is no reason for us to put our employees in the position of having to choose between keeping their jobs or having an unwanted pregnancy.”

Emily Flitter, Lauren Hirsch, Michael Isaac, Kate Kelly, ryan mac, Benjamin Mullin and Katie Robertson contributed report.

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Hammock: The foundations for success are laid, but problems remain | New https://ardud.ro/hammock-the-foundations-for-success-are-laid-but-problems-remain-new/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 18:45:00 +0000 https://ardud.ro/hammock-the-foundations-for-success-are-laid-but-problems-remain-new/ John Hammock is not even two years into his second term as mayor and is leaving with his head held high. In a term and a half, Mayor Hammock thinks Tallassee has accomplished a lot, but said big city management issues remain. Hammock said the city hit its borrowing limit when he took office in […]]]>

John Hammock is not even two years into his second term as mayor and is leaving with his head held high.

In a term and a half, Mayor Hammock thinks Tallassee has accomplished a lot, but said big city management issues remain. Hammock said the city hit its borrowing limit when he took office in 2016, but through a lot of hard work things have turned around.

“Financially, the city is in much better shape,” Hammock said. “They were barely making payroll. We stepped in, restructured some bonds at a lower rate. We were able to manage the budget in a fiscally responsible way. There have been many contract renegotiations with our suppliers.

Those negotiations put about $750,000 into the city’s coffers a year and began to cover much of the city’s utility under-recovery where Hammock said the city was losing more than $1 million a year. year.

“What I did when I walked in was run this place like a business,” Hammock said. “The police department was in shambles. I was very involved.

Other successes have occurred in improving infrastructure on finished projects such as the storm water drainage system at Emfinger to full planning.

“It’s chess, not checkers,” Hammock said. “A lot of the elect think they won’t be around in four years and think about what’s going to benefit me now.”

Mayor Pro Tem Bill Godwin thanked Hammock for his service, agreeing that Hammock did Tallassee better.

“I know we’ve all been through rough waters over the past year,” Godwin said. “We must give credit where it is due. Johnny brought a business approach to the city. Much has been accomplished and will be accomplished through his efforts. »

Hammock said he used his criminal justice degree to transform the police department by getting new vehicles, body cameras, body armor and guns. At the same time, Hammock was delving into how to bring finance and improvements to Tallassee.

“I was working 70 hours a week,” Hammock said. “I’ve been more accomplished with my department heads over the past six years than anyone over the past decades.”

These achievements are the fruit of frequent studies.

“I busted my ass to get an education, to help serve this city,” Hammock said. “The reason I was so successful is that I went to everything the league of municipalities had. I became a board member. All the breakout sessions, EDA lectures, I’ve been there. I took knowledge from other cities there and brought it back here.

Hammock said he has earned certifications for grant writing, economic development, planning and zoning, and gas pipeline safety.

“I educated myself to be the best city manager I could be,” Hammock said. “I really think that’s what this city needs.”

With the successes came struggles, particularly between Hammock and the Tallassee City Council. In November, the board removed Hammock as superintendent of utilities. With the loss of the date, Hammock lost $50,000 in salary. The decision to quit was also personal. Hammock said he had to look to his future.

“I lost two-thirds of my salary,” Hammock said. “I lost my family’s insurance. I have to pay almost $1,400 a month for COBRA insurance. I lost my RSA pension. I have to go back to the private sector to earn money.

Hammock said the move also left him almost powerless as mayor.

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“When I won re-election in 2020, it wasn’t for my bubbly personality,” Hammock said. “I was re-elected to lead a city. I am no longer that. I feel like I’m a conservative and fiscally responsible, I don’t think it’s fair for the city to pay me $25,000 a year when the council won’t let me do anything. They kind of have my hands tied. They want to micromanage everything, while the majority only show up for a few meetings a month. People want to take my position and slit my throat at the risk of the city.

Hammock said the personality clashes are causing problems with city management and will hopefully go away soon.

“My view of operational control and how they want to run the city just doesn’t fit.” said Hammock. “I don’t think it’s good for the city anymore that I’m mayor. Maybe if I leave, maybe the next mayor will appoint them full-time so they have some type of operational control. It’s like being the head coach and the assistant coaches aren’t there for practices trying to call plays during the game.

Hammock said he no longer felt able to do an effective job as mayor with the restrictions imposed by the council.

“I’m not a control freak at all, but I’m a hands-on operator,” Hammock said. “I just can’t do my job effectively as a mayor sitting on the sidelines when they don’t value my opinion anymore.”

Hammock said his decisions were based on what’s best for many, not just one.

“My vision and their vision don’t match right now,” Hammock said. “The decisions I made were always what was best for Tallassee as a whole and not for certain people, not for certain groups of people. Sometimes in local politics the creakiest wheel gets grease. I’m not all about it.

Hammock believes he helped lay the groundwork for Tallassee’s future, but Tallassee’s future could easily slip back.

“It’s hard when you see the road map you want to follow and if the board isn’t working with you and you can’t get anywhere, what’s the point of me being here?” said Hammock. “I have a lot of other communities, when I go to the League of Municipalities asking, ‘How do you get all these grants?’ They don’t know how to connect the dots.

Hammock said he saw an opportunity for himself through his consultancy business he started last year. Hammock said he already has local customers such as HDD and Unicus in Tallassee and other municipalities and engineering companies are inquiring.

“I can make a lot more money in the private sector and help other communities and help Alabama move forward than I can here in Tallassee,” Hammock said. “I have a servant’s heart. I like big picture planning, strategic planning and capital improvement planning. I love doing that kind of stuff and letting the city grow.

Hammock said Friday, July 1, the day after his resignation took effect, that he will likely register as a lobbyist.

“I can push as an elected official,” Hammock said. “I have a good relationship with legislators, state officials, and the governor’s office. These are things I did as mayor of Tallassee but I lose them when I step down.

Hammock has no intention of leaving Tallassee.

“Even though I’m not here, I live here and own a business here,” Hammock said. “We’re just going to try to grow Urban Tails and my consulting business.”

Hammock hopes that in 10 years, his consulting business will be recognized as one of the “leading consultants in economic development, community development and strategic planning in the South East”, built around his hard work and the knowledge acquired in as mayor, but said he would not be visible.

“I want to be the man behind the scenes, helping other people,” Hammock said. “I paid for my pound of flesh and my family too through the media, now is the time for me to be behind the scenes helping others.”

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COMMENT: Don’t recreate the wheel — no reason why pay equity legislation hasn’t moved forward in NL. https://ardud.ro/comment-dont-recreate-the-wheel-no-reason-why-pay-equity-legislation-hasnt-moved-forward-in-nl/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 14:19:03 +0000 https://ardud.ro/comment-dont-recreate-the-wheel-no-reason-why-pay-equity-legislation-hasnt-moved-forward-in-nl/ I don’t know much about it, but if there’s one truth I’ve gleaned from my nine years of post-secondary education (engineering, public policy, and law if we care): if anyone does something sound complicated, it’s either they don’t understand much themselves, or they’re tricked into losing interest in you. So, reading the comments about the […]]]>

I don’t know much about it, but if there’s one truth I’ve gleaned from my nine years of post-secondary education (engineering, public policy, and law if we care): if anyone does something sound complicated, it’s either they don’t understand much themselves, or they’re tricked into losing interest in you.

So, reading the comments about the long-awaited gender pay equity legislation for the province, I became endlessly curious to know what first it was: a general lack of basic understanding on the part of those politicians, or a goal to ward off the public interest?

Prince Edward Island recently announced that its pay transparency legislation will come into effect on June 1. While it’s not technically its pay equity legislation (as it came into effect, like many other provinces, like, oh, you know, 1988), it does a lot with what seems to be a bit and adds to the existing frame.

The legislation essentially mirrors that of other provinces: requiring companies to post salaries when they publicly advertise jobs and prohibiting companies from asking potential job seekers for information about past salaries or salary expectations. It also prohibits employers from going after employees who ask for pay raises or engage in salary discussions. That’s it. It’s like a few extra lines of text in, what, the whole province’s Employment Standards Act.

What it does, however, is really interesting – it forces employers to publish wage information and reduces the ability of companies to exploit workers who can take less (statistically, women and other minority workers) for similar work that would normally pay more.

Like almost all policies intended to benefit equity groups, pay equity/pay transparency legislation actually benefits everyone (at least all workers), as most studies show that the secrecy salary is how you lose by getting the most out of your position. If companies are required to publish job salaries on postings, everyone is able to maintain a good understanding of their specific value to a company and have the data to demand more without penalty.

You might be thinking, “Damn, if we want to see how this turns out, we’ll have to wait a bit and see if it works.” Except we don’t need it — because we’re the fourth (potentially the third, at the rate BC is going) last province to pass such legislation. New PEI Policies are virtually the same as existing Ontario legislation.

For those of you who really care, I’m sure the thought of reading legislation is sleep-inducing (which is a healthy response). However, as someone who has read more statutes and statutes than the average person, I can promise you that it is largely the same. And why wouldn’t it be? An effective policy is often a proven policy. Transferable legislation facilitates interprovincial business.

MHAs talk about this ‘legislation’ like we’re playing a complex ops game and if we use the wrong word in line 2 under (b) the buzzer goes off and our chance for gender equity is over . But these are bananas and a complete misunderstanding of their work or an attempt to distract us from the bewildering simplicity of these policies, especially with the legislation in place and well understood in almost every other province.


Pam Parsons, Minister Responsible for Women and Gender Equality.  - Photo File
Pam Parsons, Minister Responsible for Women and Gender Equality. – Photo File

Adjustments can be made

It’s far from me to say that the legislation that currently exists is perfect — but you can’t adjust what doesn’t exist. You’re doing everyone a favor by having no protection while we collectively work on optimizations.

Each law goes through several changes once in place – some several times a year – over decades of changes. Such is the cycle of life (and, of course, of politics).

To suggest that MPs in this province cannot even agree to add words encoding the right of workers to know how much money they could make on a job or protecting them with a process if they are taken advantage of is extremely concerning. (Almost as worrisome as the utterly serious comment from elected officials that “there are still wage gaps in provinces that have pay equity legislation”, somehow leaving aside , the fact that most provinces without pay equity legislation have the highest wage gap.

I think my naïveté shines through in my ability to remain impressed by those who constantly weave a fable about hoverboard manufacturing for somehow pulling back the curtain on (ta-da!) a reinvented wheel.

Still.


To suggest that MPs in this province cannot even agree to add words encoding the right of workers to know how much money they could make on a job or protecting them with a process if they are taken advantage of is extremely concerning.


I know that at a critical, even academic level, public policies must be adapted to the environment to which they apply. True evidence-based public policy takes fundamental principles proven in other jurisdictions and engages with local stakeholders, manages variables and modifies what is necessary to ensure that positive results are demonstrated when applied in the intended environment.

However, we’re not talking about something that falls within the jurisdiction — we just require people to be paid the same for the same work. We ask that this be put in writing so that those who find themselves in situations where this is not the case have the power to protect themselves, their colleagues, their families from this inequity. That there are mechanisms to make this fight possible.

The only way to accept that this is a “skills” issue is to suggest that women or other equity groups in Newfoundland and Labrador matter less than those in PEI. .-P.-E. or Ontario or, comparatively, if NL companies matter more than its people. It’s certainly not a complex issue — I don’t even know how the government has managed to call it divisive.


SaltWire network composite
SaltWire network composite

NL’s legacy

I will leave us with this reflection: from 1991, the government of T.-N.-L. fought tooth and nail against his people, taking a case all the way to the Supreme Court of Canada, to avoid paying his people (a subdivision of unionized women) equal pay, in violation of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms .

They asked the Supreme Court to declare that these women deserved to be paid unfairly by others in their fields. The NL government’s argument was that he just couldn’t afford them; the province would go bankrupt. The government has asked that these women in our province be denied a right under the Constitution.

The Supreme Court authorized it (years later the back pay was issued).

That was over 30 years ago. We have seen economic recessions since then, of course, but we have also had economic booms. We have not ceased to reward these women by ensuring that none quietly suffer the same fate as those who suffered it so publicly.

We have not stopped and checked in to provide continued protection for our neighbors during these times of well-being. Is this the story we want to leave of our province?

This question of “do we deserve basic pay equity and pay transparency legislation” is such a solid question for all of us. The only “them” who lose are the companies that profit from the wage gap and the silence on the public discussion of wages.

It is shameful that there is a narrative encouraged by “others” – those who simply ask for protection from oppression or abuse of power. It’s embarrassing that we’re dragging our feet not to protect each other. But the one thing I can say with confidence is that it’s not complicated: it just interferes, apparently, with other interests.

Which begs the question — whose interests are these elected officials more concerned with than the people of this province?

Lori Wareham is from Mount Pearl, NL. She has a university level background in gender public policy research and is interested in diversity and equity in labor law. She was recently called to the bar of Nova Scotia and is now beginning an article in Ottawa.

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Why is it so hard to find a decent public bathroom? https://ardud.ro/why-is-it-so-hard-to-find-a-decent-public-bathroom/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 14:38:29 +0000 https://ardud.ro/why-is-it-so-hard-to-find-a-decent-public-bathroom/ Placeholder while loading article actions Starbucks, which has long made its bathrooms available to the public, recently announced that it may soon insist, however gently, that you have to buy something for the privilege. A toilet latte, as the British would say. It is sad. Most of us – unlike Vladimir Putin – cannot take […]]]>
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Starbucks, which has long made its bathrooms available to the public, recently announced that it may soon insist, however gently, that you have to buy something for the privilege. A toilet latte, as the British would say.

It is sad. Most of us – unlike Vladimir Putin – cannot take our toilets with us; we have to depend on private establishments. All of this raises a bigger question: why aren’t public restrooms more easily accessible?

The answer requires going back to the 19th century. Our pot shortage is nothing new. Consider, for example, this long-winded but otherwise familiar complaint made by the well-meaning reformer Augustus K. Gardner at a meeting in New York in 1862.

“Any man, let alone any woman,” he declared, “can walk from one end of this city to the other, in the greatest torture, and find no relief in necessities of the body, without such indecent exposure of the person as would render the individual liable to arrest and fine by civil authorities.”

But the risk of arrest has rarely deterred townspeople, especially men. Historian Peter Baldwin perfectly captured the spirit of the times when he wrote: “Urinating men, like defecating horses, was a daily sight in the street.

The stench was bad, but it was nothing compared to the real problem: the men were exposing themselves in public. An observer writing in the New York Tribune expressed concern that “women, passing on the sidewalks, are frequently subjected to indelicate parades which they cannot avoid witnessing”.

Not that the alternatives were much better. At that time, city saloons offered the closest thing to restrooms for ordinary men, but only if they bought alcohol. These “vile grog shops”, lamented the New York Times in 1872, made “a vile dram’s profit … the compensation of convenience”. The lack of public toilets, the reformers concluded, drove men to drink.

Increasingly, city officials promoted public restrooms as a means of taming immorality, keeping men sober and, increasingly, fighting disease. But these early efforts often failed. In 1883, a writer described the public urinal in Newark, New Jersey, as “a place reeking of filth, and on the walls of which are written the basest obscenities.”

There was another problem: public restrooms still hurt women. A typical public toilet built in Boston at the turn of the century had 16 men’s toilets and 12 urinals, but only 12 women’s toilets. Additionally, many public restrooms catered exclusively to men. London, until the 1920s, had three times as many facilities for men as for women. And while men used them for free, women had to pay for the privilege.

Why the disparity? Historians like Maureen Flanagan have argued that 19th-century town planners believed that women belonged in the house, venturing outside only for short periods. A woman walking the streets for hours, let alone visiting a public restroom, was immediately suspicious: lower-class at best, and most likely a prostitute.

In fact, when the women asked the men to build a toilet to accommodate the ladies, many men became hysterical. One official in London described such a request as an “abomination”, while another said any woman making such an outlandish request had apparently “forgotten her gender” and “shouldn’t receive anything at all”.

Given the stigma attached to using public toilets, most women sought other options. By the end of the 19th century, large urban stores, which focused on female shoppers, made clean private toilets an important part of their location.

Unlike dirty, crowded, and poorly lit public restrooms, department stores offered relatively luxurious facilities for middle and upper-class women—just like at home, where indoor plumbing had become the norm. Small retail establishments followed suit, offering the promise of clean bathrooms to attract women of all classes.

However, this was not the fairest solution. As women assumed an increasingly visible role in urban reform movements in the early 20th century, they argued that public “comfort stations” should be accessible to the masses. This short-lived campaign led to the construction of more modern facilities in many towns. But it also went wrong.

Landlords and businesses near the proposed toilet blocks have objected, saying they would attract crime and disease or, even more troubling to many, gay men seeking sexual encounters. But perhaps the biggest objection was that they needed a lot of taxpayers’ money to operate.

In the 1930s, the idea that the government would provide public restrooms began a decades-long decline in the United States. Instead, the older reliance on private institutions remained the norm. It even spread to new places.

The rise of the automobile, for example, allowed people to venture away from the privacy of their own toilets. In response, service stations, taking inspiration from department stores, began to make sanitary bathrooms a major selling point.

As historian Susan Spellman has explained, they did this on the assumption that wives would decide when and where their husbands would stop the car. Although no one today regards gas stations as paragons of cleanliness, they enjoyed for decades the reputation of being the best bet when nature called.

If, of course, you were white. Southern African Americans had no such access to clean bathrooms; they also faced discrimination in other parts of the country. In fact, as historian Bryant Simon has observed, battles over access to public restrooms have become very much intertwined with the broader civil rights movement.

Many whites, already reluctant to use taxpayers’ money to fund public facilities, became even more hostile to the idea. There were a few places where public restrooms became more plentiful — the construction of the interstate system led to more state-funded rest areas — but most people in the United States turned to private facilities. .

Although gas stations have stopped making clean restrooms their calling card, other retailers have picked up the slack. That’s why we go to Starbucks when we have to go.

More from Stephen Mihm in Bloomberg Opinion:

• Why Ukrainian wheat fields sow the megalomania of dictators: Stephen Mihm

• Which comes first—Inflation or political instability? : Stephen Mihm

• Inflation advice in the 1970s was hollow and still is: Stephen Mihm

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Editorial Board or of Bloomberg LP and its owners.

Stephen Mihm, professor of history at the University of Georgia, is co-author of “Crisis Economics: A Crash Course in the Future of Finance“.

More stories like this are available at bloomberg.com/opinion

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‘We haven’t seen a downturn yet’: TN tourism industry booming despite rising inflation https://ardud.ro/we-havent-seen-a-downturn-yet-tn-tourism-industry-booming-despite-rising-inflation/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 21:58:00 +0000 https://ardud.ro/we-havent-seen-a-downturn-yet-tn-tourism-industry-booming-despite-rising-inflation/ NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – As inflation and gas prices rise, some Americans are reconsidering their summer travel plans. So what does this mean for Tennessee tourism? State tourism experts say the high prices aren’t stopping shoppers. TBI: Man committed suicide at justice center after killing woman in Greeneville “So far, we haven’t really seen any […]]]>

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WKRN) – As inflation and gas prices rise, some Americans are reconsidering their summer travel plans. So what does this mean for Tennessee tourism?

State tourism experts say the high prices aren’t stopping shoppers.

“So far, we haven’t really seen any impact from the inflationary numbers,” said Butch Spyridon, president and CEO of the Nashville Convention and Visitor’s Bureau.

Last week, about 80,000 people traveled to Nashville from all 50 states and 39 countries for CMA Fest.

Statewide tourism leaders also don’t think rising costs are keeping people from traveling to other parts of Tennessee.

“While there are concerns about inflation and the economy, we believe Tennessee is well positioned to weather these challenges. Americans are ready to travel, there is pent-up demand,” Mark Ezell said. , Commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Tourism Development.

According to Brian Wagner, assistant commissioner of marketing for the Tennessee Department of Tourism Development, tourism tax collections increased 9.7% in 2021, despite COVID-19 restrictions.

This is likely due to the state’s various outdoor attractions, including the Great Smoky Mountains, 56 state parks, and Dollywood.

“Tennessee is geographically blessed. It’s about a day’s drive from 75% of the population of the United States. So what we see is people still getting in the car and driving off, and luckily Tennessee might be a shorter trip than, say, going to a national park to the west,” Wagner said. .

Spyridon says other free attractions, like the 4th of July fireworks and 365-day-a-year live music on Lower Broadway in Nashville, can also help families keep summer vacation costs down in the state. voluntary. “We haven’t seen a downturn yet,” Spyridon said. “But we will always keep a watchful eye to see if anything changes.”

According to the State Department of Tourism Development, Tennessee is on track to post another record tourism year in 2022.

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My world, my goal | Nagpur News https://ardud.ro/my-world-my-goal-nagpur-news/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 22:56:00 +0000 https://ardud.ro/my-world-my-goal-nagpur-news/ The disappointment was visible. When Lata Mudma, a young tribal woman, typed the name of her Madia Gond tribe into the search bar, Google didn’t return many results. “There is hardly any information about us,” she told other members of her community. Lata and other boys and girls from the tribal community had gathered to […]]]>

The disappointment was visible. When Lata Mudma, a young tribal woman, typed the name of her Madia Gond tribe into the search bar, Google didn’t return many results. “There is hardly any information about us,” she told other members of her community.
Lata and other boys and girls from the tribal community had gathered to attend a photography workshop recently organized by Photography Promotion Trust in Golaguddain village in Gadchiroli district of Vidarbha. The realization began that although they could take pictures with their cell phones, they didn’t know how to put them out there for the world to see.
“The very idea of ​​running this workshop is to bring these marginalized young people into the mainstream,” says Padma Shri award-winning Sudharak Olwe, a professional photographer who, along with filmmaker Nirman Chaudhary, taught tribal youth the intricacies of handling the camera. “Photography is an art form that initiates conversation and encourages communication. We live in a digital world today and it is painful to know that there were many here who had never held a camera in their hands,” he says.
The use of cameras on their phones was limited to taking selfies. But in this workshop, holding a camera gave them a different perspective. “They learned to tell stories about themselves, their culture, their way of life,” says Olwe, who adds, “We kept the language of the class very simple and we focused on just three words: openness , shutter speed and composition. They were shown images from around the world to understand the language of a camera and how it can tell a story.
Dubbed “Grassroot Storytellers,” the initiative is supported by Photo South Asia and the Murthy Nayak Foundation. It will also extend to other tribally populated states like Odisha, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Tamil Nadu, Telangana and Gujarat.
“We plan to organize 12 workshops per day in different places with the help of local NGOs and people from these tribes. The idea is to allow young people from the tribes to develop their skills without interfering with their culture and way of life. Through photography, we hope to encourage them to document their tribes which are extremely vulnerable and threatened due to population decline, migration and other social and economic factors,” says Olwe.
The project may not be radically transformative, but it has helped promote communication, connection and access to what is happening in the world. “There are now conversations about the possibilities that they have started to explore. They learned wildlife photography, wedding photography and even fashion photography. Moreover, they can now take better pictures with their phone and post them on social networks, which they were not able to do until now,” says Nirman Chaudhary.
“What we have done may not be sustainable, but there is a masterclass project, the opening of internships and vlogs,” he adds.
Excitement is already building among those who attended the workshop. School education may be about getting jobs, but this workshop was about developing skills that can be monetized. “We now plan to pool our resources and set up a studio here that will be run by people from our community,” says Santosh, who holds a government position in the tehsil office.
“We may have the opportunity to be the photographer at formal functions in addition to taking photos at weddings and other community events,” he hopes.
For Lata, a kotwal in the tehsil office, the possibilities are endless when she looks around her through the lens. “There are so many things in our village that are interesting and need to be shown. During the monsoon, this region is cut off from the mainland due to flooding. I want to post photos from this season on Instagram and Facebook so the world knows about the beauty of this region, our struggles and how we deal with calamities,” she says.

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Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro praises Iranian fuel deliveries during his visit https://ardud.ro/venezuelan-president-nicolas-maduro-praises-iranian-fuel-deliveries-during-his-visit/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 06:50:21 +0000 https://ardud.ro/venezuelan-president-nicolas-maduro-praises-iranian-fuel-deliveries-during-his-visit/ DUBAI: When Lebanese cardiologist Walid Alami, 59, was 19, he volunteered in an emergency operating room and helped dozens of people injured during Lebanon’s 1975-1990 civil war. After a massive explosion tore through the port of Beirut on August 4, 2020, he again found himself in the midst of life-saving emergency action. However, as has […]]]>

DUBAI: When Lebanese cardiologist Walid Alami, 59, was 19, he volunteered in an emergency operating room and helped dozens of people injured during Lebanon’s 1975-1990 civil war.

After a massive explosion tore through the port of Beirut on August 4, 2020, he again found himself in the midst of life-saving emergency action.

However, as has been the case for thousands of Lebanese middle-class professionals, the country’s protracted and layered crises ultimately proved too much to bear, forcing him and his family to emigrate in search of security and economic security.

Alami gave up a lucrative cardiology practice in the United States and moved back to Beirut in 2012 so he could be closer to his extended family and his children could experience the nation of their roots.

Dr. Walid Alami. (Provided)

“I wanted my children to grow up in Lebanon and know their homeland,” he told Arab News. “My hope was to replicate my American practice there, improve the system, innovate and care for patients as I did in the United States.

“But much to my disappointment, things professionally didn’t go as planned because our system is corrupt, including the medical system.”

Undeterred, Alami persisted, hoping that the country’s fortunes would eventually turn around. But poor governance, institutional decay and the country’s economic collapse soon began to strain his family’s finances.

“I started losing money because of the banking system, corruption and declining income,” he said. “Financially and professionally, I was doing worse than ever.”

In 2021, Alami decided enough was enough. He packed his bags again and returned to the United States to reunite with his family. He had far less money in his pockets and more painful memories than a decade earlier.

The lives of her two children have also been affected by Lebanon’s economic collapse. He was struggling to pay college tuition for his 21-year-old daughter Noor, who was studying at NYU in New York. Meanwhile, 18-year-old Jad has been sent to boarding school following the devastating blast at the port.

“It was my dream for them to graduate from the American University of Beirut, but it didn’t happen,” Alami said.

“Over the past few years, I have not been able to generate enough money for a small part of my daughter’s living expenses. I found myself in a position where I could not afford to pay for my children’s school fees from Beirut, especially with the devaluation of the currency and the fact that our funds were seized.

A Lebanese activist displays counterfeit banknotes called “Lollars”, in front of a fake ATM, during a stunt to expose the high level of corruption that has plagued the country. (AFP)

Alami found himself in the position of having to borrow money from his family to help pay for his children’s education.

“I had no choice but to leave. And so, in 2021, I decided to return to the United States,” he said. “I feel like my dreams have been defeated. When I returned to Lebanon, I hoped to give back to my country of origin, to emulate them professionally and socially.

Although Alami and her family were able to return to life in the United States, the events of the past decade continue to affect her life.

“I’m almost 60 and now find myself starting over as a cardiologist,” he said. “But I have to do what I have to do to provide for my family.”

Alami’s story is well known in Lebanon, as this country of approximately 6.7 million people is experiencing one of the largest waves of emigration in its history.

Since 2019, the country has been in the grip of the worst financial crisis in its history, aggravated by the pressure of the COVID-19 pandemic and prolonged political paralysis.

The explosion at the port of Beirut on August 4, 2021, which left 218 dead and 7,000 injured, was the last straw for many Lebanese. (AFP)

For many Lebanese, the straw that broke the camel’s back was the Beirut port explosion, in which at least 218 people were killed and 7,000 injured. It caused $15 billion in property damage and left an estimated 300,000 people homeless.

Nearly two years later, the country faces a worsening food crisis as war in Ukraine drives up already high staple food prices.

According to the World Bank, Lebanon’s nominal gross domestic product fell from nearly $52 billion in 2019 to $21.8 billion in 2021, a contraction of 58.1%. Unless reforms are enacted soon, real GDP is expected to fall by 6.5% this year.

In May, the black market value of the Lebanese pound fell to a historic low of 35,600 against the US dollar. According to the UN, the financial crisis has plunged 82% of the population below the poverty line since the end of 2019.

May’s parliamentary elections offered a glimmer of hope that things might change. The Lebanese Forces party became the largest Christian party for the first time, while the Hezbollah bloc lost its majority. However, it is not yet clear whether opponents of Hezbollah will be able to form a cohesive and stable coalition capable of implementing administrative and economic reforms.

These simultaneous uncertainties have sent thousands of young Lebanese abroad in search of safety and opportunity, including many of the country’s top health professionals and educators.

According to a February 2022 report by Information International, the number of emigrants increased from 17,721 in 2020 to 79,134 in 2021, its highest rate in five years. The Beirut-based research center identified the emigration rate as “the highest recorded by Lebanon in five years”.

A sharp increase in emigration was also recorded between mid-December 2018 and mid-December 2019, with 66,800 Lebanese emigrating, compared to 33,841 during the same period in 2018.

Historically, many Lebanese have chosen to move to Western Europe, the United States, Australia and the Arab Gulf States. More recently, they have also visited Turkey, Georgia, Armenia, Serbia and even Iraq.

According to Iraqi authorities, more than 20,000 people from Lebanon arrived between June 2021 and February 2022, not including pilgrims visiting the Shia holy cities of Najaf and Karbala.

QUICKFACTS

Lebanon’s nominal GDP increased from $52 billion in 2019 to $21.8 billion in 2021 (World Bank).

The black market value of the Lebanese pound fell to 35,600 against the US dollar in May.

“The movement (of people) has increased recently,” Ali Habhab, Lebanon’s ambassador to Iraq, told Agence France-Presse news agency. He said the health sector in particular has been hit by the influx, with “dozens of Lebanese doctors offering their services” to Iraqi hospitals.

The United Arab Emirates continues to be a preferred destination for Lebanese with the financial means to relocate. Marianna Wehbe, 42, who runs a luxury PR firm, moved to Dubai in August 2021 to be with her daughter, Sophie, 17, who left Lebanon after the Beirut explosion.

“Even during the revolution (2019), the explosion and the crisis, we all found ways to continue operating and working with clients overseas,” Wehbe told Arab News.

“Most of those who left did so to be with their families and to have a safe and stable environment for their children. My daughter needed a place to study safely and keep her sanity. Beirut, with the electricity and internet cuts, it was no longer that. Her formative years are ahead of her.

Murals depicting young Lebanese migrants are seen along a street in Beirut’s Hamra district. (AFP file photo)

She said that inevitably some of this new generation of emigrants will begin to feel homesick after a while and, filled with renewed hope, may decide to return.

“Lebanon has always been like this: you leave and then you come back,” Wehbe said. “You give up and then you have hope because we all want to go home. So many families come back hoping things (will get better).”

However, the American University of Beirut’s Crisis Observatory said in August 2021 that the current loss of talent will be difficult for Lebanon to overcome as it is the country’s young people who are leaving.

The famous American University in Lebanon has lost its luster due to the country’s total economic crisis. (AFP file photo)

According to the results of an opinion survey on young Arabs published in 2020, around 77% of respondents in Lebanon said they were considering emigrating – the highest percentage of any Arab country that year. .

It is easy to understand why so many young Lebanese would seek an exit strategy. According to the World Bank, an estimated one in five people have lost their jobs since October 2019, and 61% of companies have reduced their permanent staff by an average of 43%.

“The exodus of the middle class to Lebanon is wiping out the country,” Alami told Arab News from his self-imposed exile in the United States.

The increasing difficulties faced by families in Lebanon have forced many to seek a better life abroad. (AFP)

“A nation is built on the middle class, and with all the middle class engineers, bankers, lawyers and professionals leaving Lebanon, I think we will see the whole foundation crumble. It will be very difficult to rebuild with the current situation.

The World Health Organization estimated in September 2021 that more than nearly 40% of Lebanese doctors and nurses have left the country since October 2019.

“More than 35% of medical professionals left for the Gulf, Europe or the Americas to further their careers,” Alami said.

“I don’t see myself going back there in the next 10 years, from a professional point of view, because there is no magic wand that will change things in Lebanon in the next decade. I just need to secure my children’s future now.

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Imran Khan’s reckless statements may push the establishment deeper into politics https://ardud.ro/imran-khans-reckless-statements-may-push-the-establishment-deeper-into-politics/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 07:03:06 +0000 https://ardud.ro/imran-khans-reckless-statements-may-push-the-establishment-deeper-into-politics/ June 9, 2022 There was an element of inevitability in Imran Khan’s outburst against the security establishment. He feels discouraged to be left halfway without the accessory he had become so used to. He now blames his former bosses for everything that went wrong with his rule. During a recent interview, he indicated that he […]]]>