covid pandemic – Ardud http://ardud.ro/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 05:30:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://ardud.ro/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/default1-150x150.png covid pandemic – Ardud http://ardud.ro/ 32 32 How Mandir Triumphed Over Mandal https://ardud.ro/how-mandir-triumphed-over-mandal/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 00:27:40 +0000 https://ardud.ro/how-mandir-triumphed-over-mandal/ Although there was much analysis of the BJP’s massive victory in the UP, where it won 255 seats and 41.3% of the vote, the improved performance of the Samajwadi party attracted less attention. . The SP won 111 seats and 32% of the vote, compared to 47 seats and 21.8% of the vote in the […]]]>

Although there was much analysis of the BJP’s massive victory in the UP, where it won 255 seats and 41.3% of the vote, the improved performance of the Samajwadi party attracted less attention. . The SP won 111 seats and 32% of the vote, compared to 47 seats and 21.8% of the vote in the 2017 parliamentary elections. In 2012, when it formed the government, it had 29% of the vote. If the Congress and the BSP had performed better, the gap between the BJP and the SP would have been narrower than in a clearly bipolar situation. In the end, the PS under Akhilesh Yadav failed to overthrow the government of Yogi Adityanath despite poor governance, a declining economy and anger on the ground against the BJP.

During the campaign, sensing an opportunity, Akhilesh Yadav aggressively pointed out the governance failures of the Adityanath government and formulated strategies that helped improve the SP tally. Taking advantage of the farmers’ protest, which helped shift the electoral discourse from purely communal rhetoric to economic issues, Akhilesh formed the SP-RLD alliance to mount a strong campaign in western UP, making it a major theater of battle. The Jats, Yadavs and Muslims were thought to vote for the alliance, following reports of improved relations between the Jats and the Muslims, which had broken down following the Muzaffarnagar riots in 2013.

With the existential crisis facing the BSP and the perceived collapse of the subaltern social coalition of the backward lows – as some leaders such as Swami Prasad Maurya moved to the SP – Akhilesh has struggled to shed the image of a Muslim-Yadav party by creating an anti-BJP front of small OBC and Dalit parties: the Rashtriya Lok Dal led by Jayant Chaudhary in the west of the UP, the Suheldev Bharatiya Samaj party of Om Prakash Rajbhar in the Eastern UP, Mahan Dal of Keshav Dev Maurya in Central UP, Apna Dal (K) in Eastern UP, and Janwadi Party of Sanjay Chauhan (Socialist). He also formed the Baba Saheb Vahini to attract Dalit votes. By positioning himself as the leader of the pichhade or backward, he shifted the electoral discourse to a battle between hindutva and social justice.

These strategies have shaken the western stronghold of the BJP’s UP. SP-RLD candidates defeated BJP leaders such as Suresh Rana, Sangeet Som and Umesh Malik, who had been active in the Muzaffarnagar riots. The RLD won Shamli and three seats dominated by Jat in Muzaffarnagar district – Purqazi (SC), Budhana and Meerapur. The SP-RLD alliance enjoyed Muslim support; 36 Muslim candidates were victorious, up from 24 in 2017. The peasant movement was mainly concentrated in four Jat-dominated districts: Muzaffarnagar, Shamli, Baghpat and Meerut. Of the 19 seats in these constituencies, the BJP won six, all predominantly urban; in Baghpat, the BJP beat the RLD by a narrow margin.

CSDS data indicates strong competition between the BJP and SP for votes from Kurmi, Koeri, Maurya, Kushwaha, Saini and other politically ambitious and upwardly mobile OBCs, with other parties receiving virtually none. Coming from the Kewat, Kashyap, Mallah and Nishad communities, the SP obtained a higher percentage of votes than the BJP. A similar competition for Dalit votes is visible, with the BJP and SP receiving a higher percentage of votes not only from smaller Dalit groups, but also from Jatavs.

Whichever party won, there was a challenge to Hindutva by the forces of Mandal. However, historical and immediate weaknesses did not allow the SP to defeat the BJP. In the early 1990s, the Mandal and Ram Mandir projects were launched and although the BJP won a majority in 1991, it lost in 1993 to the SP-BSP combination. But by then the Rath Yatra had taken place and the basis of the Hindu project was laid, especially among the OBCs. The destruction of the Babri Masjid led to a decline of the BJP in UP. But the SP under Mulayam Singh failed to mobilize the rear, as it favored family concerns and Yadavs and ignored inferior OBCs, leading to it being seen as a Yadav-Muslim party. Akhilesh succeeded to some extent in 2012 in broadening the base of the party by gaining support from all castes. But under Modi’s leadership, using an increased community program combined with generous welfarism, Hindutva forces managed to win the support of large sections of OBCs and Dalits. In fact, in 2022, there was little need for community rhetoric. The election was held on a Hindutva model built in 2014; today there is much greater acceptance of the BJP’s cultural agenda among OBCs and Dalits.

Despite these enormous challenges, the SP only started its 2022 election campaign in October 2021, which was too late to take advantage of the palpable anger on the ground and the discontent of OBCs and Dalits. PS leaders were not visible during the Covid-19 pandemic, nor active in the peasant movement. Moreover, efforts to mobilize farmers outside western UP were made far too late, only after the Lakhimpur Kheri incident on October 3, 2021.

The triumph of Hindutva over the forces of Mandal indicates that the BJP is moving towards realizing its ambition to create a Hindu nation, while the parties’ radical promise of social justice, due to the failures of their leaders, seems gradually weaken. Defeating the BJP in the upcoming election contest looks like a Herculean task for the UP opposition.

The author is a former Professor, Center for Policy Studies, JNU, New Delhi

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Survival Strategies for Directors of Color https://ardud.ro/survival-strategies-for-directors-of-color/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 22:08:54 +0000 https://ardud.ro/survival-strategies-for-directors-of-color/ Dr. Renée White, Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs at The New School.dr. Renee White felt she was handling things pretty well, all things considered. From the brutal murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery, to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, to the daily life experienced on campus, White was […]]]>

Dr. Renée White, Provost and Executive Vice President for Academic Affairs at The New School.dr. Renee White felt she was handling things pretty well, all things considered. From the brutal murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery, to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, to the daily life experienced on campus, White was staying the course for his students, faculty and staff. .

“I was expected to be available to everyone, to be the guide, the partner, the thinker, and there was no room for me as a woman of color, living what I was going through. by myself,” said White, who is currently provost and executive vice president for academic affairs at The New School in New York. “I didn’t even realize how much I was internalizing everything, until one particular day, when there was another incident involving violence against another black and brown body, I came home to home and I had this moment where I collapsed, literally hiding in front of my family, unable to do anything.

White shared her story during a webcast hosted by Miscellaneous and moderated by Dr. Jamal Watson. She was joined by other women of color in leadership roles who reflected on the unique burdens institutions often place on people of color, and women of color in particular. The scholars shared how they faced and survived the challenges of the past few years, what they learned, and what advice they can offer other scholars of color.

“It was important because it reminded me that as a human being, I need space to deal with the things that I face as a human being,” said White, who noted that women are generally expected to do care work, and women of color are often called upon to lead initiatives because of their identity and experience. Keeping her feelings inside was bad for her health and well-being, she said.

“If you can’t resolve the situation you’re in for, focus on your health in some way: emotionally, spiritually, in every way,” White said.

White said she found comfort in a group text channel she developed with another color faculty, where she will let off steam, listen and center herself, adding that she learned to take the time needed to reinvest in herself, her identity and her mission in higher education by re-exploring things like art, cooking and music.

Dr. Khalilah L. Brown-Dean, Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs and Professor of Political Science at Quinnipiac University.Dr. Khalilah L. Brown-Dean, Associate Provost for Faculty Affairs and Professor of Political Science at Quinnipiac University.These methods of survival were formed at a time when more and more scholars, especially scholars of color, are leaving the academic field.

“Our field is not immune to broader changes, ‘The Great Resignation’ overall,” said Dr. Khalilah L. Brown-Dean, vice provost for faculty affairs and professor of science politics at Quinnipiac University. “We’re at the two-year mark of the pandemic, and over the past two years people have had time to step back and say, ‘why am I doing what I’m doing? Why am I doing this in a place where I’m not fulfilled, and where do I want to be?'”

Institutions often seek to meet diversity quota “checkmarks,” Brown-Dean said, and the environments they create for faculty, administrators and staff of color may not include a support network. Resilience can come from building these networks independently and recognizing one’s inability to change another person’s snap judgments. Therapy, she noted, can also be a very helpful tool.

Whatever method is used, mental fatigue needs to be addressed before it manifests physically, said Dr. Jessica L. Lavariega Montforti, vice provost and accreditation liaison at California State University, Channel Islands .

“Over the years, many people have made two suggestions: keep a journal and meditate. I’m from New York, and New Yorkers, we don’t do these things,” Lavariega Montforti said with a laugh. “I do physical check-ups. I scan my body to find out where I feel tension. Sometimes you don’t realize your shoulders are close to your ears. I try several times a day to release all this tension.

Dr. Jessica L. Lavariega Montforti, Vice Provost and Accreditation Liaison at California State University, Channel Islands.Dr. Jessica L. Lavariega Montforti, Vice Provost and Accreditation Liaison at California State University, Channel Islands.Brown-Dean said this period of political, social and economic upheaval has resulted in disparate health inequalities “that manifest in myriad ways, particularly in mental health and wellbeing.”

“Faculty, students and higher education officials of color [are] both invisible and hyper-visible due to these broader changes,” Brown-Dean said. “That’s what makes it so difficult, to lead as a person of color through all of these shifts that you’re often asked to correct. It’s the context in which we all survive.

The 24/7 nature of work has also taken its toll since the pandemic took hold more than two years ago.

“I think people create strong boundaries about it, seeing their work isn’t valued the way it should be,” White said. “Institutions use the language of family and people say, ‘No, I’m an employee and you’re an employer. I provide a valuable service and am a valuable human being.

Lavariega Montforti said there was no going back to a time before COVID, adding that many color faculties found themselves more comfortable at home because they weren’t dealing with the microaggressions that they suffered in in-person situations.

“In many ways, the virtual environment has made it a bit safer. So how do we make in-person spaces places we want to come back to? We have to change what we do,” said Lavariega Montforti. “We see that the professors, the students, the staff are exhausted. Something has to give. The writing has been on the wall for some time that the ways we are engaging right now are not sustainable.

You can watch the full webcast here.

Liann Herder can be contacted at lherder@diverseeducation.com.

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Hepsiburada launches a project to support women’s cooperatives in e-commerce https://ardud.ro/hepsiburada-launches-a-project-to-support-womens-cooperatives-in-e-commerce/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 15:12:00 +0000 https://ardud.ro/hepsiburada-launches-a-project-to-support-womens-cooperatives-in-e-commerce/ ISTANBUL , March 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Hepsiburada (NASDAQ: HEPS), a leading e-commerce platform for Turkeycontinues to celebrate and support women’s entrepreneurship with the launch of the “Women’s Cooperatives: Stronger with E-Commerce in the Pandemic” project in collaboration with the International Labor Organization (ILO), Innovation for Development (I4D) and the Department of the US State […]]]>

ISTANBUL , March 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Hepsiburada (NASDAQ: HEPS), a leading e-commerce platform for Turkeycontinues to celebrate and support women’s entrepreneurship with the launch of the “Women’s Cooperatives: Stronger with E-Commerce in the Pandemic” project in collaboration with the International Labor Organization (ILO), Innovation for Development (I4D) and the Department of the US State Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (PRM).

The project aims to improve the digital and business skills of women entrepreneurs by providing training and mentoring support to more than 100 women in 5 women’s cooperatives that have been affected by the pandemic. Co-ops involved in the project will receive several benefits, including commission discounts, advertising and marketing support, free photo shoots and shipping assistance. They will also benefit from mentorship and e-commerce training. The project will contribute to the participation of women’s cooperatives in the economy to encourage local development and inclusive and sustainable economic growth.

The project will contribute to the digital transformation of women’s cooperatives to improve their access to online markets and strengthen their presence in supply chains and the economy. In addition, a new social procurement framework will help co-ops continue to set up new projects.

Today’s announcement builds on Hepsiburada’s strong track record. To date, Hepsiburada has supported 24,000 women entrepreneurs and 88 women’s cooperatives since 2017 under the Technology Empowerment for Women Entrepreneurs program. Since then, the proportion of women-led businesses operating on the Hepsiburada platform has increased from 6% to 23% of the total number of suppliers.

Commercial Director of Hepsiburada Murat Büyümez said, “We are thrilled to announce our collaboration with our international partners. This is an important demographic that Hepsiburada has had the pleasure of supporting over the past two years with a number of collaborations and investments, including the Women Entrepreneurs Challenging COVID-19 project in cooperation with Innovation for Development (I4D), SPARK and Qatar Fund for Development (QFFD).As a company that supports the participation of women in all aspects of society, We will continue to mobilize our resources to empower women entrepreneurs, building on what we have already achieved with our technology empowerment program for women entrepreneurs.”

Ayşe Turunç Kankal, ILO Livelihoods Specialist, said: “At the ILO, we are working to minimize the adverse economic and social effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has damaged traditional sales channels and caused global supply chain disruptions. particularly hard on vulnerable groups such as women, the elderly, people with disabilities and refugees. Empowering vulnerable groups and integrating them into the digital economy of the future, especially women’s cooperatives and refugee entrepreneurs, is key to achieving sustainability and diversifying sales channels. ”

I4D Director, Doğan Çelik said, “At I4D, we have been working on game-changing development interventions in areas such as jobs of the future, inclusive supply chain management, economic empowerment of women, social entrepreneurship and social procurement. these efforts take place in collaboration with the private sector and the world of sustainable development. The issue of poverty eradication is now more important than ever, so we call on the private sector and the international development community to help develop and expand this collaboration with the ILO and Hepsiburada.”

About Hepsiburada

Hepsiburada (NASDAQ: HEPS), is a leading e-commerce technology platform in Turkey, combining a globally proven e-commerce business model with a unique “super app” to meet the daily needs of its customers and help improve people’s lives. Customers can access a wide range of products and services, including same-day delivery of groceries and essentials, products from international merchants, airline tickets and payment services through the digital wallet integrated Hepsiburada, Hepsipay. As at the end of September 2021Hepsiburada has seamlessly connected 39.6 million members and approximately 67,000 active merchants.

Founded in Istanbul in 2000, Hepsiburada was built to lead the digitization of commerce in Turkey. As a women-founded organization, Hepsiburada is committed to meaningful action to empower women. Through its “Technology Empowerment for Women Entrepreneurs” program, Hepsiburada has reached more than 24,000 women entrepreneurs through Turkey nowadays.

About the ILO

The International Labor Organization (ILO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations for the world of work. It sets international labor standards, promotes rights at work, encourages decent employment opportunities, improved social protection and enhanced dialogue on labor issues.

The main objective of the ILO is to promote opportunities for women and men to obtain decent and productive work, in conditions of freedom, equity, security and human dignity.

The mission of the ILO Office for Turkey is to have a strong, visible and proactive presence in Turkey effectively engaging with government, employers’ and workers’ organizations and other international organizations to promote decent work for all, ensuring that the priorities, standards, interests and core policies of the ILO are promoted and its experience disseminated.

About I4D

I4D is a social enterprise working with/for vulnerable groups in the field of inclusive and green growth in response to development challenges. It focuses on developing examples of innovative practice with international development organizations and the private sector, and on facilitating social cohesion across the business world. In this regard, the organization provides research, communication and implementation support to national and civil society actors, national and international development organizations and development finance organizations in order to achieve the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

About the USPRM

The Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) is the humanitarian office of the State Department of The United States of America. The PRM advances the interests of the United States in providing protection, alleviating suffering, and resolving the plight of persecuted and forcibly displaced people around the world. In Turkey, United States through PRM has provided more than $1.1 billion in assistance since the start of the Syrian crisis in 2011 to support all refugees and impacted Turkish host communities.

Logo- https://mma.prnewswire.com/media/1686926/Hepsiburada_Logo.jpg

SOURCE Hepsiburada

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How a Russian-Ukrainian conflict could affect global markets By Reuters https://ardud.ro/how-a-russian-ukrainian-conflict-could-affect-global-markets-by-reuters/ Sat, 19 Feb 2022 12:40:00 +0000 https://ardud.ro/how-a-russian-ukrainian-conflict-could-affect-global-markets-by-reuters/ © Reuters. FILE PHOTO: A member of the Ukrainian State Border Guard Service patrols the area near the border with Russia in Chernihiv region, Ukraine February 16, 2022. REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko By Karin Strohecker LONDON (Reuters) – A possible invasion of Ukraine by neighboring Russia would be felt in a number of markets, from wheat and […]]]>

© Reuters. FILE PHOTO: A member of the Ukrainian State Border Guard Service patrols the area near the border with Russia in Chernihiv region, Ukraine February 16, 2022. REUTERS/Valentyn Ogirenko

By Karin Strohecker

LONDON (Reuters) – A possible invasion of Ukraine by neighboring Russia would be felt in a number of markets, from wheat and energy prices to the region’s dollar sovereign bonds and safe havens. and stock markets.

Below are five charts showing where a potential escalation in tensions could play out in global markets:

1/SHELTERS

A major risk event usually sees investors rush into bonds, generally considered the safest assets, and this time may be no different, although a Russian invasion of Ukraine is likely to push bonds even higher. oil prices – and therefore inflation.

Inflation at multi-decade highs and impending interest rate hikes caused a temperamental start to the year for bond markets, with US 10-year rates remaining near the key 2% level and 10-year yields German years above 0% for the first time since 2019.

But an outright conflict between Russia and Ukraine could change that.

In the foreign exchange markets, the euro/Swiss franc exchange rate is considered the main indicator of geopolitical risk in the euro zone, as the Swiss currency has long been considered by investors as a safe haven. At the end of January, it reached its highest levels since May 2015.

Gold, also seen as a shelter in times of conflict or economic turmoil, clings to 13-month highs.

(Chart: Safe haven price as tensions in Ukraine rise – https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/mkt/byprjxggmpe/Global%20markets%20and%20Ukraine%20tensions.PNG)

2/ CEREALS AND WHEAT

Any interruption in the flow of grain out of the Black Sea region is likely to have a major impact on prices and further fuel food inflation at a time when affordability is a major concern worldwide at the aftermath of the economic damage caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Four major exporters – Ukraine, Russia, Kazakhstan and Romania – ship grain from Black Sea ports that could be disrupted by any military action or sanction.

Ukraine is expected to be the world’s third largest exporter of maize in the 2021/22 season and the fourth largest exporter of wheat, according to data from the International Grains Council. Russia is the world’s largest wheat exporter.

(Graphic: Rising food prices are fueling inflationary pressures – https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/mkt/lbpgnwkkwvq/Rising%20food%20prices%20fuel%20inflation%20pressures.PNG)

3/ NATURAL GAS & OIL

Energy markets risk being affected if tensions turn into conflict. Europe depends on Russia for about 35% of its , mainly through pipelines that run through Belarus and Poland to Germany, Nord Stream 1 that goes directly to Germany, and others through Ukraine.

In 2020, gas volumes from Russia to Europe plummeted after lockdowns suppressed demand and did not fully recover last year when consumption surged, helping to send prices to record highs .

As part of possible sanctions if Russia invades Ukraine, Germany has said it may shut down the new Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline from Russia. The pipeline is expected to increase gas imports to Europe, but also underlines its energy dependence on Moscow.

Analysts expect Russia’s natural gas exports to Western Europe to be significantly reduced via Ukraine and Belarus in the event of sanctions, saying gas prices could return to fourth-quarter levels.

Oil markets could also be affected by restrictions or disruptions. Ukraine transports Russian oil to Slovakia, Hungary and the Czech Republic. Ukraine’s transit of Russian crude for export to the bloc was 11.9 million metric tons in 2021, down from 12.3 million metric tons in 2020, S&P Global (NYSE:) Platts said in a statement. note.

JPMorgan (NYSE:) said the tensions risked a “significant spike” in oil prices and noted that a rise to $150 a barrel would reduce global GDP growth to just 0.9% annualized in the first half. , while more than doubling inflation to 7.2%.

(Chart: European gas prices hit record highs in December – https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/mkt/lbpgnwqrwvq/European%20gas%20prices%20hit%20record%20highs%20in%20December%20Updated .PNG)

4/EXHIBITION OF THE COMPANY

Listed Western companies could also feel the consequences of a Russian invasion, although for energy companies any hit to revenue or profits could be somewhat offset by a possible spike in oil prices.

Britain’s BP (NYSE:) has a 19.75% stake in Rosneft, which accounts for a third of its output, and also has a number of joint ventures with Russia’s biggest oil producer.

Shell (LON:) has a 27.5% stake in Russia’s first LNG plant, Sakhalin 2, which accounts for a third of the country’s total LNG exports, as well as a number of joint ventures with state energy giant Gazprom (MCX:).

US energy company Exxon (NYSE:) operates through a subsidiary, the Sakhalin-1 oil and gas project, in which Indian explorer Oil and Natural Gas Corp also has a stake. Equinor of Norway is also active in the country.

In the financial sector, risk is concentrated in Europe.

Austrian Raiffeisen Bank International earned 39% of its estimated net profit last year from its Russian subsidiary, Hungarian OTP and UniCredit about 7% of theirs, while Societe Generale (OTC:) generated 6% of net group profits through its Rosbank retail operations. Dutch financial firm ING also has a footprint in Russia, though that’s less than 1% of net profit, according to JPMorgan’s calculations.

In terms of lending exposure to Russia, French and Austrian banks are the largest among Western lenders with $24.2 billion and $17.2 billion, respectively. They are followed by US lenders at $16 billion, Japanese banks at $9.6 billion and German banks at $8.8 billion, according to data from the Bank for International Settlements (BIS).

Other sectors are also exposed: Renault (PA:) generates 8% of its EBIT in Russia. Metro AG’s 93 Russian stores in Germany generate just under 10% of its sales and 17% of its core profit while Danish brewer Carlsberg (OTC:) owns Baltika, Russia’s largest brewer with a share of market of nearly 40%.

(Chart: European banks most exposed to the Ukraine crisis – https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/mkt/zdpxoaldyvx/European%20banks%20most%20at%20risk%20from%20Ukraine%20crisis.PNG)

5/ BONDS AND REGIONAL CURRENCIES IN DOLLAR

Russian and Ukrainian assets will be at the forefront of any market fallout from a possible military action.

Dollar bonds from both countries have underperformed their peers in recent months as investors reduced exposure amid growing tensions between Washington and its allies and Moscow.

Ukrainian bond markets are primarily the domain of emerging market investors, while Russia’s overall position in capital markets has shrunk in recent years due to sanctions and geopolitical tensions, somewhat mitigating any threat of contagion through these canals.

However, the Ukrainian and Russian currencies also suffered, with the hryvnia being the worst performing emerging market currency so far this year and the ruble the fifth biggest.

The situation between Ukraine and Russia presents “substantial uncertainties” for currency markets, said Chris Turner, global head of markets at ING.

“Events in late 2014 remind us of the liquidity shortfalls and US dollar hoarding that led to a substantial decline in the ruble at that time,” Turner said.

(Chart: Russia and Ukraine bonds are feeling the heat – https://fingfx.thomsonreuters.com/gfx/mkt/gkplgjrgnvb/Russia%20and%20Ukraine%20bonds%20are%20feeling%20the%20heat.PNG )

(Reporting and graphics by Karin Strohecker, Sujata Rao, Danilo Masoni, Mike Dolan, Nigel Hunt and Susanna Twidale; Writing by Karin Strohecker; Editing by Alison Williams, Catherine Evans and Christina Fincher)

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A look at 2023 through the prism of insecurity, economic crisis https://ardud.ro/a-look-at-2023-through-the-prism-of-insecurity-economic-crisis/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 19:20:43 +0000 https://ardud.ro/a-look-at-2023-through-the-prism-of-insecurity-economic-crisis/ ‘Tunde Adeparusi Published February 16, 2022 Generally speaking, the socio-political atmosphere of the African continent is such that it attracts the attention of the rest of the world. Perhaps, because of its historical outlook or past events. More often than not, these are deemed unpleasant due to the quality of life of the inhabitants of […]]]>

Generally speaking, the socio-political atmosphere of the African continent is such that it attracts the attention of the rest of the world. Perhaps, because of its historical outlook or past events. More often than not, these are deemed unpleasant due to the quality of life of the inhabitants of the rich continent despite its enormous natural resources and human capital. Perhaps the great potential and the enormous abundant opportunities in Africa, which the “outsiders” see, push them to seek out the dark continent. However, Nigeria is often referred to as the giant of Africa and regardless of its challenges and hardships, the country is truly blessed with an abundance of natural resources. Hence the prominence and economic importance of Nigeria as the seventh most populous country in the world, according to the 2015 IMF review and the most populous black African nation in the world, according to research papers from World Population Review. of 2021, cannot be denied. Considered one of the most linguistically diverse countries in the world, Nigeria is a large and complex country with many internal variations with over 450 indigenous languages.

Perhaps the main divide separating the North from the South was caused by the Nigerians themselves. Although this was initiated earlier by the colonial rulers who divided the country into regions, it still made the division between the south and the north of the country very visible. But this divide is not only due to the linguistic and/or historical factors highlighted above, it is also based on the religious, economic, environmental, cultural and political differences that exist between the two regions. So, any subject or topic on Nigeria should be of interest not only to the whole of Africa but also to the rest of the world.

This could perhaps be why Nigeria has been called Africa’s giant.

As the 2023 elections approach, the political atmosphere in Nigerian society is becoming quite tense. Political gladiators in the North and their counterparts in the South are already engaged in a political war of words over which region should inherit power in the next general election. Additionally, the two main political parties; the Peoples Democratic Party and the All Progressives Congress have also been spectacular in their engagement in different forums (which include the various social media platforms) on issues relating to the upcoming elections. However, the current APC regime’s scorecard has not been impressive enough. But despite the evidence, some members and party leaders, as well as supporters of those in power, have elevated the administration across the board, praising the president for all the ‘great accomplishments’ over the past six years. entry into office. . Some other members of the same party do not have the audacity to claim that the current regime has done well, on the contrary, they blame the non-performance of the current regime squarely on the former administration of the Peoples Democratic Party.

In reality, the past six years have been difficult for everyone in Nigeria. Additionally, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has made the situation worse. Apart from the fact that the Nigerian economy has been mismanaged, even the high rate of depletion of oil reserves around the world is cause for concern; the ratio between the naira and the dollar is at its lowest level on record, food security is highly threatened and the unemployment rate now stands at 33% (according to a Statista research paper published in 2022)! In September 2021, Nigeria’s external debt reached $38.0 billion. Despite the debilitating debt profile, the country struggles with uncertainty while infrastructure remains in a comatose state. The question remains, why is the impact of these colossal loans not visible to all?

The Nigerian health sector is a disaster. While leaders do not hesitate to travel abroad for their medical examinations with taxpayers’ money, public hospitals are mostly under-equipped and poorly paid health workers. Nigeria is one of the few countries in the world where health care workers regularly engage in strike action, either because of government arrears or poor workplace conditions. i.e. dilapidated hospital facilities and obsolete medical equipment). According to Statista’s 2019 research reviews, Nigeria has one of the highest infant mortality rates in the world, with neonatal disorders at 25.27%, diarrheal diseases at 17.14%, respiratory tract infections respiratory diseases below 16.74%, malaria 12.37% and meningitis. at 4.23%, among other health problems in infants and children. Additionally, in 2015, according to the World Health Organization, the estimated maternal mortality rate in Nigeria was over 800 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births, with an estimated 58,000 maternal deaths during that year. Interestingly, it is usually information from the poor masses that make up the statistics for all of the numbers above.

Furthermore, the current scourge of growing insecurity in Nigeria, particularly in the northern region, has taken on a dangerous dimension that threatens the very existence of the country. From the rise of ritual killings, internet fraud, armed robbery, religious crises, communal and sectarian clashes to paedophilia, kidnapping, banditry and terrorism, in all its ramifications, the crisis has taken on a frightening dimension threatening the very basis of the existence of the whole population. Almost daily, cases of abduction of innocent citizens are still being reported. And often, the victims are killed by their captors despite the payment of ransoms! It can be said that the northeastern part of the country is becoming a haven for ISWAP-Boko Haram terrorists who are determined to establish their Islamic caliphate in the region. Many local government areas in Borno State, for example, have suffered greatly at the hands of terrorists. Additionally, the violent terrorist insurgency has proliferated towards the north-west and north-central, with Kaduna, Zamfara, Katsina, Sokoto, Niger, Benue and Plateau states making headlines lately due to the violent ISWAP-Boko Haram insurgency. terrorists who attempt to capture and control communities in these states.

There is a growing wave of fuel shortages in many parts of the country. No one knows how long this may persist. The reason for this new development would be due to the import of adulterated fuel into the country! The questions are; What is the sole responsibility of the Nigeria Midstream and Downstream Petroleum Regulatory Authority, which replaced the defunct Petroleum Products Prices Regulatory Agency? How does this agency fare in monitoring and enforcing compliance in the country’s downstream sector? The fact that the nation has degenerated to this level should really be concerning. Why is it so difficult to embark on industrialization with the aim of building new refineries rather than importing and distributing poor quality products?

With all these issues at hand and the anticipation of the general election in 2023, one may begin to wonder how the country plans to navigate through the current economic difficulties and the wave of insecurity in the country. But the main question is what will a country that is heavily pregnant with relentless security challenges staggering towards a general election in 2023 give birth to?

On that final note, with uncertainties diffusing the political atmosphere of the Nigerian state, current leaders should step back and make a critical assessment or analysis of the current situation rather than being overzealous about general elections. of 2023. It is a high-risk oversight that risks being too costly for the future of the fragile African giant.

Adeparusi, an independent researcher in international criminology, wrote from London via [email protected]

Copyright PUNCH.

All rights reserved. This material and any other digital content on this website may not be reproduced, published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or in part without the prior express written permission of PUNCH.

Contact: [email protected]

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Singapore to lift quarantine for all travelers vaccinated after omicron https://ardud.ro/singapore-to-lift-quarantine-for-all-travelers-vaccinated-after-omicron/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 11:06:08 +0000 https://ardud.ro/singapore-to-lift-quarantine-for-all-travelers-vaccinated-after-omicron/ The transit hall at Changi International Airport in Singapore on January 12, 2022. Roslan Rahman | AFP | Getty Images SINGAPORE — Singapore intends to allow vaccinated visitors from all countries to skip quarantine upon arrival when the omicron wave passes, authorities announced at a virtual press briefing on Wednesday. Health Minister Ong Ye Kung […]]]>

The transit hall at Changi International Airport in Singapore on January 12, 2022.

Roslan Rahman | AFP | Getty Images

SINGAPORE — Singapore intends to allow vaccinated visitors from all countries to skip quarantine upon arrival when the omicron wave passes, authorities announced at a virtual press briefing on Wednesday.

Health Minister Ong Ye Kung said the travel rules were aimed at preventing the importation of infections into the country, but this category of cases accounts for only 1% of daily cases and “no longer has a problem.” ‘material impact’ on the Covid situation in Singapore.

Going forward, the focus will be on whether visitors to Singapore will become seriously ill and burden the healthcare system, he said.

“We should actually put less emphasis on SHN and testing on travelers, [and] more to make sure they are fully vaccinated and strengthened,” he said.

“Instead of having vaccinated lanes or VTLs with select countries that we believe are low risk, we should actually allow non-SHN travel for … fully vaccinated travelers from all countries,” Ong said. , referring to stay-at-home notices issued to visitors to Singapore.

“We shouldn’t make this transition now, but after the omicron wave has peaked and started to subside,” he added.

Authorities have not set a date for the new policy to take effect, but Gan Kim Yong, the minister of trade and industry, said the omicron wave could peak in a few weeks.

Vaccinated circulation routes

In a bid to reopen its borders, Singapore had previously announced several so-called vaccinated travel corridors that allow travelers from certain countries to visit without quarantining.

But when the new border measures come into effect, vaccinated travelers from all countries will not be subject to quarantine requirements.

“Our ultimate goal is quarantine-free travel for all vaccinated travellers,” said Transport Minister S Iswaran.

As Singapore moves to a “vaccinated traveler system”, this will first change the way it categorizes the countries from which visitors come.

From February 22, countries will be divided into three main groups – restricted, general and low infection. The vast majority of countries will be in the general category and will be subject to the same entry requirements unless a VTL has been launched.

No countries will be in the restricted category at this time, but countries and regions could be moved there if a new variant of concern is detected, authorities said.

Separately, a press release from the Ministry of Health said previously delayed vaccinated travel routes with Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates will begin on February 25. Authorities also announced that new VTLs for Israel, Hong Kong and the Philippines will be launched.

COVID situation

Singapore reported a record 19,420 new Covid cases on Tuesday.

In the last 28 days, 99.7% of reported cases had mild symptoms or no symptoms.

The city-state has reported 497,997 Covid cases and 913 related deaths since the start of the Covid pandemic.

About 90% of the population of Singapore received two injections under the national vaccination program and 64% of the population received boosters.

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New reports explore the responsibility of a mayor https://ardud.ro/new-reports-explore-the-responsibility-of-a-mayor/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 02:03:23 +0000 https://ardud.ro/new-reports-explore-the-responsibility-of-a-mayor/ Reports from researchers at the University of Sheffield highlight pressing challenges for policymakers seeking to reduce regional inequalities in England The authors of the first report argue that a new accountability model for Combined Municipal Authorities (MCA) is needed to strengthen local democracy and demonstrate the effectiveness of the decentralized system The second report explores […]]]>
  • Reports from researchers at the University of Sheffield highlight pressing challenges for policymakers seeking to reduce regional inequalities in England
  • The authors of the first report argue that a new accountability model for Combined Municipal Authorities (MCA) is needed to strengthen local democracy and demonstrate the effectiveness of the decentralized system
  • The second report explores how economic shocks, such as the 2008 global recession or the Covid-19 pandemic, fuel regional inequalities and national recovery data masks troubled areas
  • Policy makers are identified as ideally placed to support vulnerable areas with low economic resilience to future “shocks”

New reports exploring mayoral accountability and regional economic resilience by experts at the University of Sheffield show that the UK government’s Leveling Up white paper is just the start to reducing the lingering regional inequalities that still plague communities in England today.

As a member of Commission UK2070a survey of regional inequalities chaired by Lord Kerslake, reports from researchers at the University of Sheffield have highlighted pressing challenges for policy makers seeking to address these challenges in England.

Reports by Sheffield researchers, funded by the Crook Public Service Scholarships which give future leaders the opportunity to tackle pressing policy issues, were released as the government launched its flagship white paper, Leveling Up. The document sets out the government’s 12 tasks to tackle regional disparities – including a commitment that every part of England that wishes can reach a devolution deal by 2030.

The responsibility of mayors is the subject of the first report, ‘Responsible for what and to whom? Making mayoral accountability suitable for decentralization in Englishby Dr Matthew Wood, from the Department of Politics and International Relations, University of Sheffield, and Zoë Billingham, Sheffield Crook Civil Service Scholar.

There are currently nine Combined Municipal Authorities (MCAs) in England, each with a metro mayor and a bespoke devolution agreement with central government, covering governance, devolved powers and allocation of funds.

Following the publication of the Leveling Up white paper, which extended the city hall model to new parts of the country, the accountability of these local institutions and their political leaders has grown in importance. There is no plan yet to improve the accountability system for mayors.

Sheffield Crook Service Fellow Zoë Billingham said: “The White Paper recognizes that decentralization of power away from Whitehall is essential to a successful upgrading programme. However, as our report indicates, an increasing number of directly elected mayors increases the importance of accountable local leadership and its institutions. In England.”

The report also offers a series of provocations or questions that experts will use to frame further research into what a new model of AMC capable of promoting and sustaining democracy will look like. This will include whether further regional monitoring of decentralization outcomes and how local spending decision-making can be made more visible and inclusive to the public.

Dr Matthew Wood said: “Introducing clear legislative mandates and annual reporting for decentralized authorities in the White Paper will help to account for how society achieves value for money from the funding made available.

“MCAs must be core, empowered community policy-making institutions and not top-down implementation agencies.”

Wood and Billingham aim to continue their research to come up with a set of recommendations on MCA accountability by mid-2022 that should help policymakers achieve the missions set out in the White Paper.

In a separate report, Dr Aidan While from the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the University of Sheffield, together with Daniel Timms from Metro Dynamics, wrote ‘Measure, monitor and improve the resilience of places to economic shocks across the UK‘ which examines the importance of regional resilience in the face of major economic shocks such as the 2008 global recession or the Covid-19 pandemic.

Such major events can fuel unemployment and cripple local and national productivity. The authors therefore explored how policymakers can plan for future “shocks,” build regional responses and resilience, and reduce spatial inequalities in how well some economic areas recover while others struggle. for years afterwards.

Dr Aidan While said: “Our report recommends that local authorities perform a ‘stress test’ for the vulnerabilities of their local economies, to release real-time economic data at the local level during a crisis and that less resilient areas should continue to be supported by policymakers. policies (through furlough schemes for example), even though national data suggests an overall recovery.These three areas will help protect vulnerable communities from worsening regional inequalities.

Employment and productivity levels have far-reaching consequences beyond the initial crisis, affecting household incomes, well-being and longer-term health and well-being outcomes, as some regions may struggle to attract new employers or retrain communities of skilled workers.

Dr While added: “Many missions in the government’s White Paper highlight the ambition to reduce territorial inequalities on a wide range of economic and social markers. This includes raising national wages, employment and productivity, and the gap between the best performing sectors and the others will close by 2030.

“An ambitious goal that requires integrating resilience planning into policy-making and, we believe, empowering local places to plan scenarios, collect and use data to track and assess vulnerabilities will ensure that future shocks do not fuel persistent inequality across the UK.”

Professor Tony Crook, Emeritus Professor at the University of Sheffield and founder of the Crooks Fellowship Scheme, said: “I am delighted to see these two reports from our Crook Fellows. The collaboration between two outstanding policy practitioners and two of our leading academic colleagues in policy research is exactly what we wanted to achieve with the Crook Fellowships. Not only do these reports raise critical political questions, but they come at a good time given the impending announcement of the leveling program by the government.

“The reports also feed into the work of the UK2070 Commission on Regional Inequalities chaired by Lord Kerslake and I would like to highlight the collaboration we have had with his team.”

Professor John Flint, Director of Research and Innovation at the Faculty of Social Sciences, said: “I would like to commend everyone involved in researching and producing these reports and their very important recommendations to ensure accountability in the decentralization of English and to build our resilience to economic shocks across the UK.

“These projects exemplify the value of Crook Fellowships by enabling our academics and their partners in policy and practice to share and learn from each other’s expertise and work together to develop innovative new thinking focused on social sciences on the great challenges of our time. I would like to thank Professor Crook for his generous support which allows this scholarship program to continue to thrive. »

ENDS

Media contact: Rebecca Ferguson, Media Relations Officer, 0114 222 3670, rlferguson@sheffield.ac.uk

Notes to Editors:

  • All academics are available for interviews, please contact the media officer for any enquiries.
  • The reports were produced following the most recent cohort of the Crook Public Service Scholarships, founded by and named for Emeritus Professor Anthony Crook CBE. The fellowships offer future leaders in the public and nonprofit sectors the opportunity to immerse themselves in a collaborative project on a pressing policy issue or challenge – taking short periods away from their day-to-day work.
  • Professor Crook served as Pro-Vice-Chancellor for a decade until 2008 and was appointed CBE in 2014 for his services to housing. Professor Crook was chairman of Shelter and Sheffield Homes and also held senior positions with Orbit Housing Group and Coalfields Regeneration Trust. He currently chairs The Conservation Volunteers and sits on the Architects Registration Board, the Council of the Royal Institute of Town Planning and the Council of the National Academy of Social Sciences.

Warning: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of press releases posted on EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

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Konica Minolta continues its longstanding support for a healthier and more sustainable world https://ardud.ro/konica-minolta-continues-its-longstanding-support-for-a-healthier-and-more-sustainable-world/ Tue, 01 Feb 2022 15:04:40 +0000 https://ardud.ro/konica-minolta-continues-its-longstanding-support-for-a-healthier-and-more-sustainable-world/ News and research before you hear about it on CNBC and others. Claim your one week free trial for StreetInsider Premium here. Ramsey, New Jersey, 01 Feb. 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Konica Minolta Business Solutions USA, Inc. (Konica Minolta) continues to focus on building momentum and transforming key social issues for the betterment of society, […]]]>

News and research before you hear about it on CNBC and others. Claim your one week free trial for StreetInsider Premium here.


Ramsey, New Jersey, 01 Feb. 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Konica Minolta Business Solutions USA, Inc. (Konica Minolta) continues to focus on building momentum and transforming key social issues for the betterment of society, despite the uncertainties created by the covid19 pandemic. Through donations, fundraising and employee volunteerism, the company strives to contribute to a better, healthier and more prosperous future for all.

Konica Minolta joins the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals to support people, planet, and prosperity around the world with a globally measurable action plan. The current agenda targets 2030 to achieve these goals, which integrate and balance the three dimensions of sustainable development: economic, social and environmental.

“At Konica Minolta, we remain focused on how we can build momentum and transform key social issues in the United States and around the world, while helping our customers drive digital transformations to create value for people and more sustainable business processes,” Allison said. Kern, CSR and internal communication manager. “As a global company of more than 40,000 employees, we are committed to a single goal: to benefit our customers and society as a whole. »

Specific to the United States, in 2021 the company and its employees continued their efforts to make a difference with local support for four important nonprofit organizations:

  • American Red Cross – Konica Minolta made a significant donation to support disaster relief last fall.
  • National Kidney Foundation – As in 2020, Konica Minolta employees walked virtually to raise funds and awareness for the NKF, of which the company is a longtime charity partner, last November.
  • Blue Angels Foundation – Company and employees raised funds to support veterans care in honor of Veterans Day.
  • Feeding America – Konica Minolta donated to food safety for every view of its annual holiday video.

The company also offers its employees the opportunity to give back through volunteer efforts and giving initiatives focused on environmental sustainability as well as health and wellness. Along the same lines, Konica Minolta strives to support its global customers and business partners with the aim of creating value for society. Earlier this month, Chairman and CEO Shoei Yamana shared two key areas as Konica Minolta looks to 2025.

The first is to meet the needs of customers in various industries with optimal solutions to transform ways of working and improve service quality through cutting-edge technologies. This now includes supporting the digital transformation of local governments in Japan.

The second objective is to facilitate business growth in the areas of measurement, inspection and diagnostics. Konica Minolta relies on its imaging technology to “make the invisible visible”, offering valuable solutions tailored to the value chain of every industry.

To this end, in April 2021, Konica Minolta launched the CARE program, Japan’s first platform to detect – through genetic testing – the risk of diseases before they develop, in cooperation with the Seirei Social Welfare Community. The CARE program will provide healthy, unaffected people with personalized cancer risk information based on genetic analysis and support early disease detection to provide preventative treatments.

Konica Minolta is committed to creating new value for its customers and communities in every way possible. Learn more about his corporate citizenship online.

About Konica Minolta

Konica Minolta Business Solutions USA, Inc. is reshaping and revolutionizing the workplace to achieve true connectivity with the Intelligent Connected Workplace. The company guides and supports the digital transformation of its customers through its extensive portfolio of office technologies, including IT services (all covered), intelligent information management, managed print services and solutions. industrial and commercial printing. Konica Minolta has been on CRN’s MSP 500 list nine times and the World Technology Awards named the company a finalist in the Computer Software category. Konica Minolta has been recognized as the #1 Brand for Customer Loyalty in the Multifunction Desktop Copier Market by Brand Keys for fourteen consecutive years, and is proud to be listed on Forbes 2021 America’s Best-in-State Employers list. The company received the BLI 2021 A3 Line of The Year Award from Keypoint Intelligence and the BLI 2021-2023 Most Color Consistent A3 Brand Award for its bizhub i-Series. Konica Minolta, Inc. has been named to the Dow Jones Sustainability World Index for nine consecutive years and has spent four years on the list of the World’s 100 Most Sustainable Companies. Konica Minolta partners with customers to shape ideas and works to bring value to our society. For more information, visit us online and follow Konica Minolta on Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn and Twitter.

# # # # #

Maggie Grande
Konica Minolta Business Solutions U.S.A., Inc.
1-551-500-2659
mgrande@kmbs.konicaminolta.us

Source: Konica Minolta Business Solutions USA, Inc.

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Red Deer Local Immigration Partnership Launches Anti-Racism Campaign https://ardud.ro/red-deer-local-immigration-partnership-launches-anti-racism-campaign/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 23:21:22 +0000 https://ardud.ro/red-deer-local-immigration-partnership-launches-anti-racism-campaign/ Charges dropped for Penhold man charged at anti-racism rally in Red Deer RDLIP conducted a survey a year ago to gauge attitudes towards racial issues at the local level. The survey found that 50% of respondents believe racism is higher in Red Deer than elsewhere, with 47% agreeing that it has become more severe since […]]]>

Charges dropped for Penhold man charged at anti-racism rally in Red Deer

RDLIP conducted a survey a year ago to gauge attitudes towards racial issues at the local level.

The survey found that 50% of respondents believe racism is higher in Red Deer than elsewhere, with 47% agreeing that it has become more severe since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

While more than 29% of total respondents say they have experienced racism, approximately 80% of visible minorities and 70% of Aboriginal respondents said they have directly experienced racism in the past five years.

RDLIP says the campaign will focus primarily on Red Deer residents who may feel uninformed or apathetic about racial issues.

“We want to share stories of how diversity helps, how it makes our communities stronger,” says Ezgi Sarioglu, program manager. “Our research tells us that people feel powerless in the face of racist behavior. We want to make them aware of the anti-racism project and show them the advantages of welcoming people from all walks of life.

The campaign will run primarily on social media platforms, as well as traditional media, inviting the public to visit rdlip.ca/antiracism.

The webpage is populated with stories of productive relationships between Red Deer residents from different backgrounds, as well as educational resources on anti-racism and the positive impact of immigrants on the social and economic life of Red Deer.

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India in debt trap, its youth disillusioned, global survey finds https://ardud.ro/india-in-debt-trap-its-youth-disillusioned-global-survey-finds/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 06:52:57 +0000 https://ardud.ro/india-in-debt-trap-its-youth-disillusioned-global-survey-finds/ “Global Risks Report 2022” is out and as with all countries it also listed the top risks for India. The country faces broken state-to-state relations, debt crises, widespread youth disillusionment, failed tech governance and digital inequality among top five risks, according to the survey. Leaders Opinion (EOS) of the World Economic Forum. The report draws […]]]>

“Global Risks Report 2022” is out and as with all countries it also listed the top risks for India. The country faces broken state-to-state relations, debt crises, widespread youth disillusionment, failed tech governance and digital inequality among top five risks, according to the survey. Leaders Opinion (EOS) of the World Economic Forum. The report draws on findings from the EOS and the Global Risk Perceptions Survey (GRPS) to compile its findings.

Climate change dominates the discourse

The report delves deeper into the risks facing the world today. As perceived by several respondents in the report, climate action failure, extreme weather events and biodiversity loss are among the top three global risks.

The report took into account the views of more than 12,000 national leaders who identified critical near-term risks for their 124 countries, brought together through EOS and 1,000 global experts, leaders and other participants through the GRPS.

According to the report, respondents highlighted the lack of implementation of effective measures by governments to contain climate change. He says that this “concern reveals a lack of confidence in the world’s ability to contain climate change, particularly due to worsening societal fractures and economic risks”.

In addition to these three main environmental concerns, there are two more serious climate-related risks. Environmental damage and natural resource crises feature in this list as the seventh and eighth most serious risks globally over the next 10 years.

Covid-19 delays efforts to tackle climate change

As noted in the report, the economic crisis created by the Covid-19 pandemic risks setting back efforts to combat climate change. Absolute climate inaction can lead to losses of between 4% and 18% of global GDP with varying levels of impact depending on the region.

In the survey carried out before the COP26 meeting in Glasgow, 77% of participants said that international efforts to mitigate climate change had “not started” or were in the “early development” stage.

Erosion of social cohesion, livelihood crises and infectious diseases are respectively identified as the fourth, fifth and sixth main risks. Debt crises and geo-economic clashes rank ninth and tenth respectively.

Growing disparities and geopolitical conflicts

The report indicates that the erosion of social cohesion is the risk that has worsened the most globally since the start of the Covid-19 crisis. The disparities will only widen, he warns. Citing research from the World Bank, the report mentions that the richest 20% of the world’s population will have recovered half of their losses by 2021, while the poorest 20% will have lost another 5% of their income. By 2030, 51 million more people are expected to live in extreme poverty compared to pre-Covid times.

Similarly, geopolitical fractures will also widen, and some of them will be visible in the economic area. The report mentions how India and Japan implemented protectionist policies during the pandemic.

Digital inequality and technological risks

Although not among the top 10 serious risks, technological risks, such as digital inequalities and cybersecurity failures, are nevertheless alarming. GRPS respondents identified them as critical short- and medium-term threats to the world.

The world saw a 435% increase in ransomware in 2020. He noted that 95% of cybersecurity issues could be attributed to human error. The UK has seen a significant increase in internet banking fraud. It grew 117% in volume and 43% in value compared to 2020 as more people made purchases online.

Among the most vulnerable in this category are those who only log in now or who will soon. Around 40% of the world’s population is not yet connected to the Internet.

Increase in migration

The report notes how climate change along with economic hardship and political unrest have forced millions of people to leave their homes in search of a better future abroad. ‘Involuntary migration’ is a top long-term concern for GRPS respondents, while 60% see ‘migration and refugees’ as an area where international mitigation efforts have ‘not started’ or are in “early development”. More frequent and extreme weather events, including fires, floods and droughts, could displace more than 200 million people by 2050

These migratory pressures are likely to create international tensions.

Growing competition in space

Rising competition for a slice of outer space could spark friction. About 11,000 satellites were launched from Sputnik 1 in 1957, but another 70,000 could enter orbit in the coming decades.

The report states: “Although the risk is still relatively low, an increase in the number of satellites also increases the risk of collision or, at the very least, the need to engage in emergency manoeuvres. For example, the International Space Station (ISS) was damaged in May 2021 when debris entered its robotic arm.

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